soft sign


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soft sign

neurologic findings (for example, dyspraxia, dysdiadochokinesis) and behavioral phenomena (for example, postures, involuntary movements) that, although of no specific diagnostic significance, may be associated with developmental delay in normal children and with neuropsychiatric orders in adults.

soft sign

Any of a number of signs that, considered collectively, are felt to indicate the presence of damage to the central nervous system. These signs include incoordination, visual motor difficulties, nystagmus, the presence of associated movements, and difficulties with motor control.
See also: sign
References in periodicals archive ?
We explored all the cases who had soft signs of vascular injury, our positive exploration rate was 61%.
Schizo-obsessive and obsessive-compulsive disorder: comparison of clinical characteristics and neurological soft signs.
Neurologic soft signs in obsessive-compulsive disorder.
Study of the neurological soft signs in a sample of obsessive compulsive patients and its correlation with the severity of obsessive-compulsive symptoms and the degree of insight.
Relation of neurological soft signs to nonverbal memory performance in obsessive-compulsive disorder.
Neurological soft signs (NSS) in 200 treatment-naive cases with schizophrenia: a community-based study in a rural setting.
Prospective evaluation of neurological soft signs in first-episode schziophrenia in relation to psychopathology: state versus trait phenomena.
There were proportionately more boys in our sample (73%) than in the overall Columbia-Presbyterian NCPP cohort (52%) because of higher prevalence of neurologic soft signs in boys.
First, as noted above, the cohort from which this sample was derived was originally selected on the basis of the presence of neurologic soft signs at 7 years of age.
Ismail et al (31) reported that patients with schizophrenia and their siblings scored higher than normal controls on the soft signs total score, as well as the sensory integration and motor functioning subscales.
Soft signs, especially those involving motor tasks, were found to be more genetically mediated.
In contrast, Lawrie et al (36) suggested that soft signs are not an indicator of genetic risk specifically for psychosis.