footpad

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footpad

(fo͝ot′păd′)
n.
The cushionlike flesh on the underpart of the toes and feet of many animals.

footpad

the thick, spongy structure located on each digit, and under the metacarpal- and metatarsal-phalangeal joints, and the carpus of dogs and cats. The skin is thickened, tough, and may be hyperpigmented and the hypodermis contains large amounts of adipose tissue. Important in birds, in which they are commonly damaged.
Enlarge picture
Footpads on the dog. By permission from Aspinall V, O'Reilly M, Introduction to Veterinary Anatomy and Physiology, Butterworth Heinemann, 2004

footpad abscess
caused by wound infection in fowls; painful and swollen.
collagen footpad disorder
see collagen footpad disorder.
footpad hyperkeratosis
see digital hyperkeratosis, nasal hyperkeratosis, hardpad.
References in periodicals archive ?
Beside footpad dermatitis (FPD) or plantar pododermatitis and hock burns (HB) it also embraces breast blisters or burns (Berg, 2004).
This implies that there is a size limit to sticky footpads as an evolutionary solution to climbing - and that turns out to be about the size of a gecko.
Other skin lesions included footpad hyperkeratosis, crusting, depigmentation, and erosions (Figure 2).
Sharp ice or frozen stones protruding through the snow can cause lacerations on the footpads.
Footpad swelling was monitored by serial weekly measurements, for 30 days, of footpad thickness with the help of a digital pachymeter.
Fissuring in areas of hyperkeratosis, such as footpads and the nasal planum, may also be found (CASE et al.
His design for a family home uses a timber frame resting on individual footpads instead of concrete foundations.
It also grows ears and footpads that can detect sound.
They offer excellent cardiovascular benefits with no jarring impact on your hips, knees, and ankles, since your feet stay in contact with the footpads at all times.
Fresh tracks with large, rounded footpads reveal the presence of a big cat.
GIBBET HILL ROAD on the edge of Coventry was once the haunt of highwaymen and footpads.
Loboa loboi has never been cultivated in vitro (1,2), although it has been successfully transmitted to armadillos, tortoises, and the footpads of hamsters and mice under experimental conditions (2,6).