footling


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foot·ling

(fut'ling),
A fetal foot, particularly one that descends into the birth canal in an incomplete breech presentation.
[foot, fr. A. S. fot, + -ling, dim. suffix]

foot·ling

(fut'ling)
A fetal foot, particularly one that descends into the birth canal in an incomplete breech presentation.
[foot, fr. A. S. fot, + -ling, dim. suffix]
References in periodicals archive ?
Roebuck said that he was shocked and amazed to see Cricket Australia allowing Paine, a player held in high regard in all quarters, to risk body and bone in "some footling contest."
instrumental conversion of the fetus to a footling breech; 3.
If Ofcom can raise its head from examining some footling TV ad which has irritated fewer than a dozen viewers perhaps it could bring pressure to bear on the broadcasters.
The late Kingsley Amis said; "Thomas reduces the work of other poets to footling whimsy." Neither Betjeman nor Amis can be said to have had any Welsh axe to grind.
There''s too much of this nanny-state footling around.Like the furore by the thought police over St Edward''s College giving KitKat biscuits to pupils once a term.
Nine days into treatment, at 23 weeks' gestation, 210 hours after membrane rupture, a 415-g live-born girl was delivered spontaneously in footling breech with Apgar scores of 1 (1 min) and 5 (5 min).
Did it not cross the mind of anybody in Government that if you have hundreds of thousands of people pouring into the country and you have no homes and no jobs for them then the answer is not some footling bit of bureaucracy.
Until this happens, the further certainty is that others, elsewhere, will take what amounts to the footling risk of a few years' jail.
Finally, the author concludes an already footling essay with a weak cliche: "after all, it is love that truly makes the world go round" (263).
Much philosophical discussion of problems of classification seems quite footling (e.g., the discussion of the problems of classifying objects which are various combinations of round, red, and wooden, cited in Quine's contribution to [23]), precisely because it ignores the significance of internal complexity in determining natural kinds.
One midwife, Diane, who was direct-entry and apprenticed before she became a CNM, recently did a footling breech in the water, and a shoulder dystocia with the baby's cord wrapped around its neck.
He was a footling breech birth, but was normal upon examination, fed well, and discharged from the nursery after 24 hours.