zoonoses


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zoonosis

 [zo″o-no´sis] (pl. zoono´ses)
a disease of animals transmissible to humans. adj., adj zoonot´ic.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

zoonosis

(zō-ō-nō′sĭs) plural.zoonoses [″ + nosos, disease]
An infection common in animal populations that occasionally infects humans. Over 250 organisms are known to cause zoonotic infections, of which 30 to 40 are spread from pets and animals used by the blind and deaf. Immunosuppressed people and those who work with animals are esp. at risk of developing zoonoses.
zoonotic (-nŏt′ĭk), adjective
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

zoonoses

Diseases of animals that can affect people. The zoonoses do not include human diseases transmitted from person to person by animal vectors. The zoonoses include ANTHRAX from cattle, BRUCELLOSIS and Q FEVER from goats and sheep, GLANDERS from horses, LEPTOSPIROSIS and PLAGUE from rats, PSITTACOSIS from birds, RABIES from any mammal, ROCKY MOUNTAIN SPOTTED FEVER from small mammals, TOXOCARIASIS from dogs, TOXOPLASMOSIS from cats, TUBERCULOSIS from cows and YELLOW FEVER from monkeys.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Zoonosis (plural, zoonoses)

Any disease of animals that can be transmitted to humans under natural conditions. Lyme disease and babesiosis are examples of zoonoses.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
According to the annual reports, the most common zoonoses in the Autonomous Province of Vojvodina (APV) as well as in the Central Banat District of Vojvodina (CBDV) are Trichinellosis, Salmonellosis and Q fever [6].
Some developed countries have networks advocating 'One Health' for combating zoonoses, whereas inadequacies exist in developing nations such as those West African countries in which the current EVD epidemic is taking place.
The one health approach plays a significant role in the prevention and control of zoonoses. It has been noted by the World Health Organization (WHO) [4] and Graham et al.
The lack of effective and sensitive surveillance systems combined with low awareness of the risks associated with zoonoses contributes to a general under estimation of the importance of zoonoses in developing countries (1-4).
From cyst-causing tapeworms to avian flu, zoonoses present a major threat to human and animal health,' said Delia Grace, a veterinary epidemiologist and food safety expert with ILRI in Kenya and lead author of the study.
It also found the United States and Europe - especially Britain - Brazil and parts of Southeast Asia may be becoming hotspots of "emerging zoonoses", which are infecting humans for the first time, are especially virulent or are becoming drug resistant.
The authors correctly described risk for Chagas disease from exposure to infected insect vectors but included Chagas disease in the table, "Zoonoses acquired by close contact with pet, 1974-2010." The bloodborne protozoan that causes Chagas disease is transmitted not by contact with an infected mammal but by contact with a vector insect that has bitten an infected mammal (2).
Zoonoses are defined by the World Health Organisation as "Diseases and infections which are naturally transmitted between vertebrate animals and man".
Sixty per cent of them are so-called zoonoses, or diseases that have been transmitted from animals to humans.