zooid

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Related to zooids: phylum Bryozoa, siphonophore

zooid

 [zo´oid]
1. animal-like.
2. an animal-like object or form.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

zo·oid

(zō'oyd),
1. Resembling an animal; an organism or object with an animalian appearance.
2. An animal cell capable of independent existence or movement for example, ovum or a spermatozoon, segment of a tapeworm.
3. An individual of a colonial invertebrate, such as coral.
[G. zoōdēs, fr. zōon, animal, + eidos, resemblance]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

zo·oid

(zō'oyd)
1. Resembling an animal; an organism or object with an animalian appearance.
2. An animal cell capable of independent existence or movement, as the oocyte or a sperm, or the segment of a tapeworm.
3. An individual of a colonial invertebrate, such as a coral.
[G. zoōdēs, fr. zōon, animal, + eidos, resemblance]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

zooid

  1. any individual polyp of a colony of invertebrate animals that are linked together. For example, COELENTERATES have feeding polyps (gasterozoids), and reproductive polyps (gonozoids).
  2. a motile cell or body, such as a gamete, produced by an organism.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
We also observed a quick reestablishment of a regular hemolymph flow after injury and despite the removal of all zooids from the vascular system.
Se observaron ciliados, Oikopleura, copepodos y nauplios en el 2% de los sacos branquiales de los zooides, pero no en los contenidos estomacales.
Testes were selected for measurement in groups of four, with each group consisting of the two pairs of testes in neighboring zooids (ensuring that subsamples incorporated variation within testes pairs and between testes in neighboring zooids).
This suggests that none of the plasticity in the zooid morphologies that they detected was induced by biotic agents.
These juveniles were both at the single zooid stage while 98% of the juveniles in the controls had progressed to the two-zooid stage.
While some studies do report growth as increases in branch length, colony diameter, colony area, or number of zooids over time (e.g., Stebbing, 1971; Ryland, 1976; Vail and Wass, 1981; Winston and Jackson, 1984; Patzold et al., 1987; Stanwell-Smith and Barnes, 1997), they are mainly about weakly calcified or encrusting species that have low biomass and do not produce much sediment.
Endobugula sertula" ensure a high concentration of the defensive compounds or the bryostatin-synthesizing symbionts in the ovicell-bearing zooids. To identify host genes potentially involved in these processes, we used suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH) to examine differentially expressed B.
Bryozoa grow as colonies of phenotypically variable modules termed zooids. Zooids within a colony are clone mates.
It is thought, however, that root-like projections emanating from these colonies can survive and bud new zooids when favorable conditions return (Numakunai, 1960, 1967).
For clonal organisms such as Bryozoa that grow by budding modules (zooids), which together form a colony, phenotypic variance components form a partial record of ancestry from which genetic parameters can be reconstructed.