zoogeography

(redirected from zoogeographic)
Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia.
Related to zoogeographic: Zoological distribution

zo·o·ge·og·ra·phy

(zō'ō-jē-og'ră-fē),
The geography of animals; the study of the distribution of animals on the earth's surface.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

zoogeography

(zō′ə-jē-ŏg′rə-fē)
n.
The biological study of the geographic distribution of animals, especially the causes and effects of such distribution.

zo′o·ge·og′ra·pher n.
zo′o·ge′o·graph′ic (-ə-grăf′ĭk), zo′o·ge′o·graph′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
zo′o·ge′o·graph′i·cal·ly adv.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

zoogeography

(zō″ō-jē-ŏg′ră-fē)
The study of the distribution of animals on the earth.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Some of those barriers and the zoogeographic patterns of coastal Oregon and Washington freshwater fishes were reviewed by Minckley and others (1986) and McPhail and Lindsey (1986).
Zoogeographic distribution of terrestrial/freshwater tardigrades from current literature.
Nemertean genera and species of the world: an annotated checklist of original names and description citations, synonyms, current taxonomic status, habitats and recorded zoogeographic distribution.
List of marine fishes of the Arctic region annotated with common names and zoogeographic characterizations.
The recent mammals of the Neotropical Region: A zoogeographic and ecological review.
A zoogeographic and functional approach to the selection of marine reserves on the west coast of South Africa.
This ecoregion was included in the Nearctic biogeographic realm (by Olson et al., 2001) and within the Mexican phylogenetic zoogeographic region of the Nearctic realm for mammals and other terrestrial vertebrates (Holt et al., 2013).
CALLAGHAN, C.J., 1985.--Notes on the zoogeographic distribution of butterflies of the subfamily Riodininae in Colombia.
Differences in life-history strategy would be perplexing given that these stocks occur in the same zoogeographic province (mid-Atlantic coast of the United States) and given that some of them are in close latitudinal proximity (e.g., the AR and Chesapeake Bay stocks).