zoning

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zon·ing

(zōn'ing),
The occurrence of a stronger reaction in a lesser amount of suspected serum, observed sometimes in serologic tests used in the diagnosis of syphilis, and probably the result of high antibody titer.

zon·ing

(zōn'ing)
The occurrence of a stronger reaction in a lesser amount of suspected serum, observed sometimes in serologic tests used in the diagnosis of syphilis, and probably the result of high antibody titer.

zoning

(zōn′ing)
The occurrence of a stronger fixation of complement in a lesser amount of suspected serum; a phenomenon occasionally observed in diagnosing syphilis by the complement-fixation method.
References in periodicals archive ?
Because zoning and covenants are the dominant forms of land use
those substantive differences have fallen away as zoning has developed
institutional difference between covenants and zoning: they point out
Up until now, the only online source for quickly finding a property's zoning was updated just twice a year.
Prior to the launch of ZoLa, researching the specifics of zoning regulations was often a difficult, time consuming task involving scanning through maps and cross-referencing documents.
To determine whether waterfront access plan regulations or Inclusionary Housing opportunities apply to a particular property required detailed inspection of several series of maps in multiple sections of the 12 volumes of the Zoning Resolution.
Several zoning reform proposals have been advanced on economic premises.
B([l.sup.*]) is larger than B([l.sup.0]) and the difference is what motivates zoning.
Suppose zoning authorities, seeking to abate congestion and increase land-based benefits, establish limits to development in the community.(5) Assume zoning authorities implement an optimal zoning plan.
Since the current Zoning Resolution was enacted in 1961, its regulations have been continually amended to reflect new administration priorities, changing practices in urban planning, and a variety of other considerations.
The zoning changes apply to buildings which have not "vested" under the prior regulations.
The statutory criteria for vesting (sometimes called grandfathering) under prior zoning controls are different than the "substantial construction" necessary to vest CPC or BSA approvals.