zinc sulfate


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Related to zinc sulfate: copper sulfate

zinc

 [zingk]
a chemical element, atomic number 30, atomic weight 65.37, symbol Zn. (See Appendix 6.) It is a trace element in the diet, a component of several enzymes, including DNA and RNA polymerases and carbonic anhydrase. It is abundant in red meat, shellfish, liver, peas, lentils, beans, and rice. A well-balanced diet assures adequate intake of zinc. Those who may suffer from zinc deficiency include persons on a strictly vegetarian diet and those who are on a high-fiber diet. In the latter case, the zinc is bound to the fiber and is eliminated in the feces without having been absorbed through the intestinal wall. Poor absorption of zinc also can occur in persons with chronic and severe bowel disease. The recommended daily intake is 12–15 mg for an adult. A severe deficiency of zinc can retard growth in children, cause a low sperm count in adult males, and retard wound healing. Signs of a deficiency include anorexia and a diminished sense of taste. An excessive intake of zinc (usually in those who work with the metal or breathe its fumes) can either cause pneumoconiosis or interfere with the body's use of copper and other trace elements, producing diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, and other signs of intestinal irritation.
zinc acetate a salt used as an astringent and styptic.
zinc chloride a salt used as a nutritional supplement in total parenteral nutrition and applied topically as an astringent and a desensitizer for dentin.
zinc oxide a topical astringent and skin protectant; also a sunscreen.
zinc stearate a powder of zinc in a compound with stearic and palmitic acids; used as a water-repellent skin protectant in dermatoses.
zinc sulfate a topical astringent for mucous membranes, especially those of the eye.
zinc undecylenate the zinc salt of undecylenic acid; it is a topical antifungal.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

zinc sul·fate

used as a local astringent in the treatment of gonorrhea, indolent ulcers, conjunctivitis, and various skin diseases, and internally as an emetic.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

zinc sulfate

n.
A colorless crystalline compound, ZnSO4·7H2O, used medicinally as an emetic and astringent, as a fungicide, and in wood and skin preservatives. Also called white vitriol.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

zinc sul·fate

(zingk sŭlfāt)
Used as a local astringent to treat gonorrhea, indolent ulcers, conjunctivitis, and various skin diseases, and internally as an emetic.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Findings of present study showed that synchronic application of ORS and zinc sulfate syrup in comparison with only ORS application is more efficient for both treatment parameters (declining of diarrhea frequency and shorting of healing period), qua in control group only 5.8% of infants in first 24 hours and 15.4% in 48 hours of treatment have healing signs, but in experimental group 30% of infants in first 24 hours and 55% of them in 48 hours had healing signs.
CCRT has emerged as an acceptable therapy for oral cancers because of its good survival rate.14 Although CCRT means combining their adverse effects which leads to acute toxicity which might had surpassed the beneficial effect of zinc sulfate on taste acuity.
Group A received oral zinc sulfate in a dose of 10 mg/kg/day during 45-day period before meals in three divided times, and group B received systemic MA (glucantime) 20 mg/kg/day intramuscularly for 20 days with a maximum of three vials of glucantime.
Under non stress conditions zinc sulfate application increased seed number per row (Table 3).
Inclusion of zinc-amino acid complexes instead of zinc sulfate (as the standard source) led to 4.6% increase in average total body weight gain.
Similarly, superior absorption properties are reported for zinc methionine chelate in contrast with zinc sulfate and zinc oxide.
The original zinc sulfate precipitation that we used was similar to previous publications.
VOS[O.sub.4] produced vasoconstriction in pulmonary artery rings (Figure 2A) and IPL, whereas zinc sulfate had little vasoactive effect (Figure 2B).
This producer of zinc chemicals, including active zinc oxide, zinc carbonate, zinc ammonium chloride and zinc sulfate, has its own rubber compound laboratory with rheometer, tensile strength meter roller mills, etc., for quality control of its zinc oxide.
In the Netherlands, researchers gave folic acid, zinc sulfate, both, or a placebo to 103 men with low sperm counts.
The bacteria were cultured in three different agars and zinc sulfate was the zinc compound used.