zinc protoporphyrin


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zinc protoporphyrin

A biochemical marker of iron deficiency. It is only moderately effective in diagnosing the disease.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Gorgels, "Diagnostic value of zinc protoporphyrin in a screening strategy for a-thalassemia," European Journal of Haematology, vol.
We required that two a priori criteria be met for inclusion in the meta-analysis: a) sample sizes, means, and SDs were either reported or could be determined for the ALAD1-1 and ALAD1-2/2-2 genotypes; and b) combined with one or more of the following measures--BLL, tibia lead level, trabecular (patella or calcaneus) lead level, zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP), hemoglobin, serum creatinine, dimercaptosuccinic acid-chelatable lead, and systolic or diastolic blood pressure.
Failure to insert Fe into the protoporphyrin ring results in depressed heme formation and an accumulation of protoporphyrin; this in turn chelates zinc in place of Fe, to form zinc protoporphyrin. These effects also result in modifications of some other metabolite concentrations in urine (ALA-U), blood, (ALA-B) and plasma (ALA-P), coproporphyrin in urine (CP).
Zinc protoporphyrin levels were significantly associated with infection, which suggests that infection may complicate poor nutrition in nutritionally at-risk children by affecting iron status, Rebecca Crowell of the University of Connecticut, Storrs, said in a poster presented at the annual meeting of the American Society for Nutritional Sciences.
The boy's zinc protoporphyrin level peaked at 556 mM/ M (normal: 25-65 mM/M).
Measurements of transferrin receptor and erythrocyte zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPPIX) concentrations have been suggested as screening tools to detect iron deficiency (1,2).
Previous studies have suggested that [delta]-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) types 1-2 or 2-2 are protective against the toxicity of blood lead (PbB) when zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP) levels are low because of differential binding of lead in erythrocytes.
Because ceramic glaze can contain lead, a blood sample was obtained to be tested for lead and zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP) levels.
The patient's zinc protoporphyrin level was 229 [micro]g/dL (normally [is less than] 40 [micro]g/dL).
Measurements of the heme precursors free erythrocyte protoporphyrin (FEP) and erythrocyte zinc protoporphyrin (ZnP) have also been used for screening purposes.
In 14 workers, zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP) levels were >100 (micro)g/dl (reference range: 0-79 (micro)g/dl), values consistent with moderate lead poisoning; in three of these workers, ZPPS were >600 (micro)g/dl, levels often associated with severe lead poisoning.
The patient's postchelation blood lead and zinc protoporphyrin levels were 81 [micro]g/dL and 125 [micro]g/dL, respectively, and bone lead levels measured by a K-x-ray fluorescence (KXRF) instrument revealed tibia (cortical) and patella (trabecular) bone lead levels of 210 and 660 [micro]g/g bone mineral, respectively.