zinc oxide


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zinc

 [zingk]
a chemical element, atomic number 30, atomic weight 65.37, symbol Zn. (See Appendix 6.) It is a trace element in the diet, a component of several enzymes, including DNA and RNA polymerases and carbonic anhydrase. It is abundant in red meat, shellfish, liver, peas, lentils, beans, and rice. A well-balanced diet assures adequate intake of zinc. Those who may suffer from zinc deficiency include persons on a strictly vegetarian diet and those who are on a high-fiber diet. In the latter case, the zinc is bound to the fiber and is eliminated in the feces without having been absorbed through the intestinal wall. Poor absorption of zinc also can occur in persons with chronic and severe bowel disease. The recommended daily intake is 12–15 mg for an adult. A severe deficiency of zinc can retard growth in children, cause a low sperm count in adult males, and retard wound healing. Signs of a deficiency include anorexia and a diminished sense of taste. An excessive intake of zinc (usually in those who work with the metal or breathe its fumes) can either cause pneumoconiosis or interfere with the body's use of copper and other trace elements, producing diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, and other signs of intestinal irritation.
zinc acetate a salt used as an astringent and styptic.
zinc chloride a salt used as a nutritional supplement in total parenteral nutrition and applied topically as an astringent and a desensitizer for dentin.
zinc oxide a topical astringent and skin protectant; also a sunscreen.
zinc stearate a powder of zinc in a compound with stearic and palmitic acids; used as a water-repellent skin protectant in dermatoses.
zinc sulfate a topical astringent for mucous membranes, especially those of the eye.
zinc undecylenate the zinc salt of undecylenic acid; it is a topical antifungal.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

zinc ox·ide

ZnO; used as a protective in ointment, as a dusting powder; also used in paint as a substitute for lead carbonate.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

zinc oxide

n.
An amorphous white or yellowish powder, ZnO, used as a pigment, in compounding rubber, in the manufacture of plastics, and in pharmaceuticals and cosmetics.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

zinc oxide

Toxicology A compound used in welding which, in excess, may cause zinc intoxication Uses Topically, astringent, calamine lotion. See Zinc.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

zinc oxide

A white powder with mild ASTRINGENT properties used as a dusting powder or incorporated into creams or ointments and used as a bland skin application. Mixed with oil of cloves, zinc oxide forms an effective and pain-relieving temporary dressing for a tooth cavity. Zinc oxide is an ingredient in numerous proprietary medical preparations.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

zinc ox·ide

(zingk ok'sīd)
Used as a protective in ointment and as a dusting powder; also used in paint as a substitute for lead carbonate.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
In 2007, according to a clinical trial, the use of topical zinc oxide versus salicylic acid-lactic acid combination in treatment of viral warts showed comparable results.7 The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy of 20% zinc oxide ointment versus 15% salicylic acid-15% lactic acid combination in treatment of common viral warts.
From the UV-visible spectrometer analysis concluded that zinc oxide and iron oxide nanoparticles had an intense absorbance at ~250 nm which indicates that the synthesized particles were photosensitive in UV region [21].
The groups receiving different amounts of Nanozinc oxide didn't show significant delay in time of coming down from the safe platform compared to the groups receiving the combination of different doses of Nanozinc oxide and vitamin C (30 mg/kg) (Figure 4.) Thus, the presence of vitamin C as an antioxidant cannot prevent from memory deficits due Nano zinc oxide.
"Zinc oxide establishing itself in markets outside the rubber sector is largely a development of the recent past." Remarkable, considering that the production process has, in principle, changed little since its debut in 1931.
Before illuminating the semiconductor (zinc oxide)-dye suspension with UV light, in this study, 30 min dark adsorption was used.
By having the zinc oxide in the form of a nanowire, (diameter 300 nanometers; length 400 micrometers), and bonded with metals at each end, Wang has effectively produced a tiny transistor, which is gated (open or shut, with electricity either flowing or not) by the strain applied to the nanowire.
The amount of zinc oxide (for example) which optimally satisfies requirements for performance, cost, and transparency simultaneously will differ from formulation to formulation and may well optimize at a different point for specific customers.
Zinc oxide can also act as a sensor for detecting changes in electric current due to absorption of gas molecules and so be used for gas leak warning devices.
Norwegian energy and metals recycler ScanArc ASA said on Friday (13 February) that its subsidiary ERAS Metal AS has halted production at its zinc oxide plant in Hoyanger, Norway, due to high mercury emissions.
Zinc producer Horsehead Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Horsehead Holding Corp., will add an energy surcharge on all shipments of zinc oxide, effective August 1, 2008.
The sapphire's molecular structure made all the zinc oxide crystals grow on its surface in the same direction, which pushed the gold droplets along.
For years, researchers have been making electron-abundant n-type zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowire crystals.