zero-order kinetics

zero-order kinetics

Therapeutics The in vivo dynamics of drug elimination, which is linear with time, proportional to the concentration of the enzyme responsible for catabolism, and independent of substrate concentration. See Michaelis-Menten equation, Therapeutic drug monitoring. Cf First order kinetics.
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For the zero-order kinetics, the cumulative percentage of curcumin versus time (in hour) was plotted based on
With Table 2 analysis, the data was expressed in zero-order kinetics model at 100[degrees]C before the maximum HMF generation in all of vinegar samples.
In order to determine the rate and drug transport mechanism of Clarithromycin from controlled release tablets, the dissolution profiles were fitted in various kinetic/mathematical models given as under Zero-Order Kinetics (W=K1t), First-Order Kinetics [ln (100-W)=In100-K2t], Higuchi Kinetics (W=K4 t ) Hixson Crowell Kinetics (100-W) 1/3 =1001/3-K3t), Korsmeyer's Peppas's Kinetics (Mt/M8 = K5tn).7 In Korsmeyer's Peppas Kinetic model an (n) value which is a diffusional exponent defines the mechanism of drug transport from matrix tablets.
Time course of [C.sub.10]-[C.sub.40] elimination was fitted by zero-order kinetics (1) and first-order kinetics (2) using QCExpert statistical pack (Trilobyte software, Czech Republic):
It was observed that, in case of proposed formulations F1, F2, and F3, zero-order kinetics were predominant.
Among the models tested, for the first 2 hours, the drug release profiles for NIF batch [A.sub.4] were best fitted by zero-order kinetics based on the regression coefficient ([R.sup.2]) of 0.9858.
As the metabolising enzymes become saturated, metabolism switches to zero-order kinetics (where the drug is eliminated at a constant rate, regardless of concentration).
A statistical t-test at P = 0.05 revealed that the value of b was significantly different from 1, suggesting that Cu release from the calcareous studied soils did not follow zero-order kinetics, which supports our previous finding that the zero-order equation failed to describe Cu release kinetics as judged by the low values of [R.sup.2] and the high values of SE (Table 3).
Five different models Were used to fit the experimental data obtained in the drug release experiments, i.e., zero-order kinetics, first-order kinetics.
The ideal design should have an even drug release rate in the gastrointestinal tract by zero-order kinetics, but in most cases the final dosage form ends up demonstrating first-order kinetics.
For adsorption concentration data, logarithmic decay functions were found to best describe the decreases in N[O.sub.3]-N and SP concentrations in the water column with time, and linear functions were found to best describe the zero-order kinetics governing decreases in N[H.sub.4]-N concentrations.