yolk

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Related to yolky: vitellus, yolkier

yolk

 [yōk]
the stored nutrient of the ovum.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

yolk

(yōk, yōlk),
1. One of the types of nutritive material stored in the oocyte (ovum) for the nutrition of the embryo; yolk is particularly abundant and conspicuous in the eggs of birds. Synonym(s): vitellus
2. Fatty material found in the wool of sheep; when extracted and purified, it becomes lanolin.
[A.S. geolca; geolu, yellow]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

yolk

(yōk)
n.
1.
a. The portion of the egg of egg-laying vertebrates, such as reptiles and birds, and of certain invertebrates that consists chiefly of protein and fat and serves as the primary source of nourishment for the early embryo.
b. This portion of the egg of a bird, especially a chicken, which is large, yellow, and surrounded by albumen.
2. A greasy substance found in unprocessed sheep's wool, which is refined to make lanolin.

yolk′y adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

yolk

(yōk)
1. One of the types of nutritive material stored in the oocyte for the nutrition of the embryo; particularly abundant and conspicuous in the eggs of birds.
Synonym(s): vitellus.
2. Fatty material found in the wool of sheep; when extracted and purified, it becomes lanolin.
[A.S. geolca;geolu, yellow]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

yolk

the food store in the eggs of the majority of animals, made up mainly of fat and protein granules. It must contain all the essential ingredients for the entire development of the embryo. Where yolk is present in the egg, as in chickens, there is meroblastic CLEAVAGE, but where it is absent, or nearly so, cleavage is holoblastic, as in Amphioxus. Yolk is almost absent from mammal eggs, since food is provided directly from the mother, via the PLACENTA.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

yolk

(yōk)
One of the types of nutritive material stored in the oocyte (ovum) for the nutrition of the embryo; particularly abundant and conspicuous in birds' eggs.
[A.S. geolca;geolu, yellow]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Dyed Eggs / Animal Decapitated 9 20.0 [+ or -] 6.7 + 5 ml mineral oil Decapitated 10 21.8 [+ or -] 5.0 + 100 mg ZR512 Decapitated 8 14.3 [+ or -] 4.1 + 100 mg ZR513 Starved Control 8 37.2 [+ or -] 6.6 + 5 ml mineral oil % of Yolky Eggs Experiment 3 Actively Vitellogenic Starved 6 96.6 [+ or -] 2.1 Decapitated 5 52.0 [+ or -] 20.1 Effect of JH I Upon Ovarian Growth Adult Age Ovary at Time of Adult Age dry weight Treatment at Sacrifice (gm x [10.sup.5]) Experiment 1 N N (hours) (days) + std.
pseudoexigua) develop in the plankton from large, yolky eggs (380-415 [[micro]meter]) without feeding by the larva, and have reduced or lost many of these distinctive larval structures, such as an open mouth, functional gut, or organized ciliated bands.
Females with enlarged ([greater than or equal to]1 mm) yolky ova were considered to be reproductive (Semlitsch, 1980).
They are encased in yummy chocolate but there's a yellow, yolky topping under it which is a bit sickly.
The egg took centre stage as my knife opened up a yolky sunburst of colour amid the green truffle and bubbling Swiss cheese.
Although a heavy duty wine, it went well with my beautifully crisp salad, presented in a huge mound of curling leaves with flaked tuna, crescents of green pepper and yolky egg, dotted with olives and finished off with a tangy citrus/oil dressing.
Two rashers of bacon, square slice, yolky fried egg, two potato scones, lashings of sauce and a strong mug of tea.
erythrogramma in detail, and they suggested that these embryos develop wrinkles in part because the fertilization envelope fits tightly over large, yolky eggs and leaves little room for the expanding blastoderm.
The ecological consequences of oophagic or adelphophagic development compared to development from large yolky eggs are also poorly understood and based on few studies (Spight, 1975; Rivest, 1983; Kamel et al., 2010).
Fans of the yolky choccy will be invited to bid until March for a series of exciting adventures, including flying to Hong Kong or Hollywood, paragliding, powerboating or going into zero gravity using a brand new currency called Eggcred, the basis of which will be used Creme egg wrappers.
Franzen (1983) suggested that in bivalve molluscs there was a correlation between the length of the sperm nucleus and size of egg: species with sperm with a long nucleus had large yolky eggs.