yew

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yew

(yo͞o)
n.
1. Any of several poisonous evergreen coniferous trees or shrubs of the genus Taxus, having scarlet cup-shaped arils and flat needles that are dark green above and yellowish below. Yews contain compounds used in medicine and are often grown as ornamentals.
2. The wood of any of these trees, especially the durable, fine-grained wood of the Eurasian and North African species Taxus baccata, used in cabinetmaking and for archery bows.

yew (yōōˑ),

n Latin names:
Taxus brevifolia, Taxus baccata; parts used: bark, branch tips; uses: the deriva-tive taxol is used to treat metastatic cancers (particularly breast and ovarian); yew has traditionally been used for joint complaints, fever; precautions: pregnancy, lactation, children; patients with liver disease, compromised immune systems; those taking antineoplastic medications; may cause low blood pressure, hepatotoxicity, thrombocytopenia, anemia, leukopenia, neutropenia. Toxic, should not be used without supervision. Also called
American yew, California yew, chinwood, globeberry, ground hemlock, Oregon yew, or
western yew.

yew

see taxus.
References in periodicals archive ?
Now cuttings produced by the annual trimming of yew trees in churchyards across Castle Morpeth are to be sent off to be processed for use in manufacturing the drug.
Sir Walter Scott writes in a footnote of Ivanhoe that King Edward I "decreed that yew trees should be planted in all the English churchyards in order that there would be a plentiful supply of wood for longbows.
Bark from the evergreen Pacific yew tree is being used as a major weapon to combat ovarian cancer.
If the company pays a trivial sum for the Pacific yew trees harvested on public lands and doesn't pay the Government anything for its exclusive rights to Federally funded research information, what do the taxpayers get in return?
Naturol's breakthrough technology is likely to beneficially change the economics and methods of extracting Paclitaxel and other Taxanes from Yew trees -- the world's most important source of these bio active compounds.
Yew trees were traditionally planted in churchyards for shade, to make bows, or to keep cattle away as the seeds were poisonous.
These were old yew trees but they could have lived to be ancient.
Because they are so poisonous, this is one reason why yew trees are often seen growing in churchyards, as here they would be kept safely away from grazing livestock.
I am wondering what happened to all of the 20 million yew trees planted in those nurseries in Rhode Island, Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Michigan?
Children who helped plant a monumental millennium maze of yew trees at a Northumberland stately home are being invited to celebrate its fifth birthday next month.
Hoffman's team has found taxanes in all parts of the blight-resistant hazelnut trees, but concentrations are only one-tenth as high as in the yew trees.