yellow weed

yellow weed

References in classic literature ?
These bare places were grown up with dingy, yellow weeds, hiding innumerable tomato cans; innumerable children played upon them, chasing one another here and there, screaming and fighting.
Thus ends the epic battle between flower power and weed power, or the Sweets and the Sours, and thus begins a basic legend about the life history of the dandelion, a pretty yellow weed that eventually goes to seed and blows away in the wind.
But you probably have not noticed the explosive abundance of that metre high, bushy yellow weed called common ragwort (also know as ragweed).
Eunice Burley of Pegswood said the familiar tall-stemmed yellow weed was visible on half an acre of land close to a bike track off the A197.
But let's just remember that this yellow weed is not all bad.
The society organises an annual Ragwort Awareness Week during which as much of the yellow weed as possible is removed from bridleways and fields.
In around three to four months time, a pretty, yellow weed will be popping its head in fields and paddocks across Wales.
Ragwort, if you didn't know, is the poisonous yellow weed that you see growing tall in the summer by the side of the road and in the fields.
The threat in this instance comes from ragwort, the poisonous yellow weed that at least one expert believes is responsible for the death of hundreds, and perhaps even as many as 6,000 horses nationally every year.
The yellow weed is rampant on Anglesey after a hot summer and the equine community fears an epidemic of deaths in years to come.
Some local authorities have already begun asking people to let them know where the bright yellow weed is growing in a bid to prevent it from spreading.
This pernicious yellow weed seems to be running rampant in some areas,and often very close to horse pastures.