yellow fat disease

yellow fat disease

A vitamin E deficiency syndrome affecting various mammals, in particular cats, who are fed excess omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids from fish oils, especially tuna.

Clinical findings
Greasy, dull coat and flaky skin; severe pain when touched; anorexia, fever. In humans, excess fish-oils cause increased bleeding time, especially after aspirin ingestion, which may play a role in cardiac necrosis and increased susceptibility to catecholamine-induced stress.

Management
Limit intake of tuna; add vitamin E to diet.

yellow fat disease

a disease of many species, but particularly cats and mink, characterized by inflammation of adipose tissue and deposition of lipofuscin pigment in the adipose cells. Caused by a diet high in unsaturated fatty acids and low in vitamin E. In cats, it has been associated with feeding canned red tuna. Affected animals usually show anorexia, fever and a generalized hypersensitivity that is due to painful fat depots. Especially in cats, subcutaneous fat may be palpably hard, lumpy and painful. Called also pansteatitis and steatitis.
References in periodicals archive ?
This oxidation model was used to mimic Yellow Fat Disease, a disease resulting from a diet high in unsaturated fatty acids and deficient in Vitamin E.
Overall, Yellow Fat Disease symptoms occurred in pigs fed high oxidant diets, without antioxidant supplementation.
Fact: Although many cats enjoy it, feeding tuna exclusively can not only rob cats of adequate levels of vitamin E and lead to steatitis or yellow fat disease, but also does not constitute a complete and balanced diet.