thuja

(redirected from yellow cedar)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

thu·ja

(thū'jă, -yă),
The fresh tops of Thuja occidentalis (family Pinaceae), an ornamental evergreen tree of eastern North America, a source of cedar leaf oil; has been used internally as an expectorant, emmenagogue, and anthelmintic, and externally as a mild counterirritant.
Synonym(s): thuya
[G. thyia, an African tree with sweet-smelling wood]

thuja

Herbal medicine
Thuja occidentalis. A tree the leaves and twigs of which contain flavonoids, glycosides, mucilage and volatile oils (primarily thujone, but also borneol, camphor, fenchone, limonene, myrcene and pinene). Thuja is anthelmintic, expectorant, and stimulates smooth muscle; it was used by Native Americans to stimulate menstruation, and has been used topically by Western herbalists for skin infections and for rheumatic pain.
 
Homeopathy
A remedy used for brittle nails, caries, menstrual dysfunction, oily skin and warts.
 
Chinese medicine
Thuja orientalis, see there.

thu·ja

(thū'yă)
The fresh tops of Thuja occidentalis, an ornamental evergreen tree of eastern North America, a source of cedar leaf oil; used internally as an expectorant, anthelmintic, and a drug to cause menstruation, anthelmintic, and externally as a mild counterirritant. Also spelled thuya.
[G. thyia, an African tree with sweet-smelling wood]
References in periodicals archive ?
Yellow cedar and western red cedar were the most durable species above ground at all sites, and they stood out from the rest most strongly in Hawaii, with eastern white cedar, Douglas-fir, western larch, and tamarack all showing shorter, and similar, service lives.
In addition to Japan, yellow cedar is exported to Taiwan and China.
The stress-laminated deck is about one-third meter deep and consists of 7.62-cm (3-inch) by 33.02-cm (13-in) rough-sawn Alaska yellow cedar laminations and is continuous for the full length of the bridge.
For western red cedar, yellow cedar, and western larch, eight decks were constructed for exposure at each test site: two heartwood/old growth, two heartwood/second growth, two heartwood plus sapwood/old growth, and two heartwood plus sapwood/second growth.
Because of its unique physiology, yellow cedar is particularly susceptible to late season freeze injuries.
The compounds found in the heartwood of Alaska yellow cedar, for example, are known to prevent decay for up to a century after the tree has died.
I continued across the gully hoping the route might reappear and found myself clawing through a tangle of shrubby yellow cedar. Clearly, this was not the way.
However, despite this restraint, the nature of wood dominates the character of the spaces both inside and out, with yellow cedar rain-screen cladding and acoustic panelling, and over 250 laminated and faceted douglas fir columns.
According to Tim Bristol, a SEACC grassroots organizer, "Red and yellow cedar, for instance, is so much more valuable on the Asian market that very little of it is consumed in the U.S.
Historically, a lot of yellow cedar has been felled in roadbuilding operations on the B.C.
Contract Awarded for Yellow cedar shingles number 1 grade blue label 18" perfections
A conference room is being redone in Alaskan yellow cedar, his son's favorite wood.