years of potential life lost


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years of po·ten·tial life lost (YPLL),

measure of the relative impact of various diseases and lethal forces on society, computed by estimating the years that people would have lived if they had not died prematurely due to injury, cancer, heart disease, or other causes.

years of potential life lost

Public health A measure of the impact of premature mortality on a population, calculated as the sum of the differences between a predetermined minimum or desired life span usually set at 65 in calculations and the age of death for individuals who died earlier than that predetermined age. See 'Healthy people 2000. '. Cf QALY.

years of po·ten·tial life lost

(yērz pŏ-ten'shăl līf lawst)
Measure of the relative impact of various diseases and lethal forces on society, computed by estimating the number of years that people would have lived if they had not died prematurely.
References in periodicals archive ?
Years of potential life lost to life expectancy (YPLL) and before age 65 years ([YPLL.sub.65]) and mean YPLL and [YPLL.sub.65] per decedent for decedents aged [greater than or equal to] 25 years with coal workers'pneumoconiosis, * by year of death--United States, 1999-2016
"Growth in fatal overdoses was strongly correlated with increased mortality rate and years of potential life lost for midlife non-Hispanic whites from 1999 to 2015," Ruhm writes.
By comparison, coronary heart disease accounted for 14,871 years of potential life lost. Add in the nearly 1,500 years lost because of diabetes, 1,200 because of cerebrovascular disease, and deaths resulting from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease--which shares several risk factors with coronary heart disease--and the total approaches 20,000 of the 48,000 years of potential life lost in patients with severe mental illness, he said.
In summary, CDC's estimates of the average number of deaths and years of potential life lost each year due to cigarette smoking were reasonable.
"Alcohol remains a major contributor to cancer mortality and (years of potential life lost)," the researchers wrote.
Overdose resulted in 830,652 years of potential life lost, a number comparable to that of motor vehicle crashes.
Statistics already show a 50 percent higher rate of death globally from chronic disease than from communicable diseases, although there are still more years of potential life lost to communicable diseases because they kill more infants and children.
The annual years of potential life lost before age 65 years (YPLL) attributed to CWP decreased 91.2%, from an average of 1,484 YPLL per year during 1968-1972 to 154 per year during 2002-2006; however, both YPLL and mean YPLL per decedent have been increasing since 2002, from 135 to 169 YPLL in 2006 and from 4.9 in 2002 to 9.4 YPLL in 2006.
Altogether, smoking represented $6.8 billion in lost productivity and about 587,000 years of potential life lost from 34,363 deaths, or 17.1 years per death, the researchers found.
There should be a healthy debate considering the advantages of measuring decreasing death rates, as opposed to measuring decreases in years of potential life lost, or potential gains in life expectancy.
New state-specific data on smoking-attributable mortality (SAM) and years of potential life lost (YPLL) from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show that average annual overall SAM rates decreased during the two time periods by 44.4/100,000 population older than 35 years of age in Nevada, by 37.8/100,000 in California, and by 33.4/100,000 in Virginia.
To characterize trends in premature mortality attributed to asbestosis in the United States, CDC analyzed annual underlying cause-of-death data for 1968-2005, the most recent years for which data were available.* This report describes the results of that analysis, which indicated that annual years of potential life lost before age 65 years (YPLL) attributed to asbestosis increased 64%, from an average of 146.0 YPLL per year during 1968-1972 to 239.6 per year during 2001-2005 (regression trend for the 5-year moving average, p<0.001), for an overall total of 7,267 YPLL (mean per decedent: 6.2) over the entire period.