years of life lost


Also found in: Acronyms.

years of life lost

The number of years a person might have lived if the accident or disease that killed him had not occurred.
References in periodicals archive ?
Impact of summer heat on urban population mortality in Europe during the 1990s: an evaluation of years of life lost adjusted for harvesting.
In Mexico, CKD is now the second cause of 'years of life lost' after ischemic heart disease, and the third cause is diabetes.
residents born between 2000-19 would experience 223,000 fewer premature deaths, 50,000 fewer lung cancer deaths and 4,200,000 fewer years of life lost, according to a report from the Institute of Medicine.
Together they account for 7.4% of the disability-adjusted life years of the total global burden, 0.5% of the total years of life lost to premature mortality, and 22.9% of the years lived with disability.
"In terms of the number of years of life lost (YLLs) due to premature deaths in Bahrain, ischemic heart disease, road injuries and diabetes were the highest ranking causes in 2013.
"Only with routine mammography can we decrease the years of life lost to breast cancer," she says.
To date, most studies have looked at the impact of smoking bans on adult outcomes, but children account for more than a quarter of all deaths and over half of all healthy years of life lost due to exposure to second-hand smoke.
Research shows that raising the tobacco purchasing age nationwide would result in 223,000 fewer premature deaths, 50,000 fewer deaths from lung cancer and 4.2 million fewer years of life lost for those born between 2000 and 2019.
As a measure of premature mortality, potential years of life lost (PYLL or YPLL, years of potential life lost) involves estimating the average years a person would have lived if she/he had not died prematurely, thus emphasizing deaths that occur at younger ages.
The report said that Potential Years of Life Lost (PYLL), used by the WHO and OECD, take into account the age at which deaths occurs by giving greater weight to deaths at younger age and lower weight to deaths at older age.
David Halpern, chief executive of the Behavioural Insights Team and board director, and chair of the forum, said, "Behavioural factors such as diet, smoking, and accidents now account for the majority of healthy years of life lost. Within medical practice, behavioural factors also loom large in the transmission of infectious disease, medical adherence, and clinical errors.
Mortality and years of life lost due to illnesses associated with alcohol consumption by gender, 2006-2012.