yawn

(redirected from yawns)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial, Idioms, Encyclopedia.

yawn

(yawn),
1. To gape.
2. An involuntary opening of the mouth, usually accompanied by inspiration; it may be a sign of drowsiness or of vital depression, as after hemorrhage, but is often caused by suggestion.
[A.S. gānian]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

yawn

(yôn)
v. yawned, yawning, yawns
v.intr.
To open the mouth wide with a deep inhalation, usually involuntarily from drowsiness, fatigue, or boredom.
n.
The act of yawning.

yawn′er n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

yawn

The involuntary opening of mouth to inhale/exhale O2/CO2; thought to be a response to the slowed breathing typical of boredom, exhaustion or sedentary inactivity—which are characterised by increased CO2 and reduced O2 in the circulation—by opening the mouth wide and inhaling deeply, yawns quickly intake O2 and expel CO2 to bring the gases back to normal levels.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

yawn

 The involuntary opening of mouth, often caused by suggestion–“contagious” and accompanied by breathing inward then outward; repeated yawning may indicate drowsiness, depression, or boredom
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

yawn

(yawn)
1. To gape.
2. An involuntary opening of the mouth, usually accompanied by a movement of respiration; it may be a sign of drowsiness or of vital depression, as after hemorrhage, but is often caused by suggestion.
[A.S. gānian]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

yawn

(yawn)
1. To gape.
2. An involuntary opening of the mouth, usually accompanied by inspiration; it may be a sign of drowsiness or of vital depression, as after hemorrhage, but is often caused by suggestion.
[A.S. gānian]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
More recently, researchers have come to see potential for the yawn to be used as a diagnostic marker of neurological disease.
"Contagious yawning, in which yawning is triggered involuntarily when we observe another person yawn, is a common form of echophenomena - the automatic imitation of another's words (echolalia) or actions (echopraxia)," the study said.
Each subject had to click a button every time they yawned. Overall, 68% of the participants yawned.
WAITING to enter the world is a tedious business - so perhaps it should come as no surprise that foetuses yawn. Scientists at Durham University have shown conclusively for the first time that unborn babies yawn repeatedly in the womb.
Everyone knows when one person yawns it can set others off - but why the phenomenon occurs is little understood.
The first I should like to mention is a paper called Dogs Catch Human Yawns (by R M Joly-Mascheroni et al in Biology Letters, 2008) which reported an experiment in which 29 dogs watched a human yawning at them and the experiments counted how many of them yawned back.
Contagious yawns are not to be confused with spontaneous yawns.
Senju thinks it is likely that dogs' yawns induce yawning in humans.
SPANG, Monika (text) Sonja Bougaeva (illus.) Monika Smith (trans) The Big Yawn Gecko Press, 2009 32pp NZ$18.99 pbk ISBN 9781877467189
LONDON: Dogs find human yawns contagious, suggesting they have a rudimentary capacity for empathy, British scientists said yesterday.
According to a survey commissioned by the soft drink manufacturer, 84% of Americans admit to experiencing an "afternoon slump" every day, about half acknowledge yawning five times a day and 86% feeling that yawns are contagious.
When some one yawns, his or her alertness is heightened, as the sudden intake of oxygen increases the heart rate, rids the lungs and the bloodstream of the carbon dioxide build-up, and forces oxygen through blood vessels in the brain, while restoring normal breathing and ventilating the lungs.