yawn

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yawn

(yawn),
1. To gape.
2. An involuntary opening of the mouth, usually accompanied by inspiration; it may be a sign of drowsiness or of vital depression, as after hemorrhage, but is often caused by suggestion.
[A.S. gānian]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

yawn

(yôn)
v. yawned, yawning, yawns
v.intr.
To open the mouth wide with a deep inhalation, usually involuntarily from drowsiness, fatigue, or boredom.
n.
The act of yawning.

yawn′er n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

yawn

The involuntary opening of mouth to inhale/exhale O2/CO2; thought to be a response to the slowed breathing typical of boredom, exhaustion or sedentary inactivity—which are characterised by increased CO2 and reduced O2 in the circulation—by opening the mouth wide and inhaling deeply, yawns quickly intake O2 and expel CO2 to bring the gases back to normal levels.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

yawn

 The involuntary opening of mouth, often caused by suggestion–“contagious” and accompanied by breathing inward then outward; repeated yawning may indicate drowsiness, depression, or boredom
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

yawn

(yawn)
1. To gape.
2. An involuntary opening of the mouth, usually accompanied by a movement of respiration; it may be a sign of drowsiness or of vital depression, as after hemorrhage, but is often caused by suggestion.
[A.S. gānian]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

yawn

(yawn)
1. To gape.
2. An involuntary opening of the mouth, usually accompanied by inspiration; it may be a sign of drowsiness or of vital depression, as after hemorrhage, but is often caused by suggestion.
[A.S. gānian]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
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