yawn

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yawn

(yawn),
1. To gape.
2. An involuntary opening of the mouth, usually accompanied by inspiration; it may be a sign of drowsiness or of vital depression, as after hemorrhage, but is often caused by suggestion.
[A.S. gānian]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

yawn

(yôn)
v. yawned, yawning, yawns
v.intr.
To open the mouth wide with a deep inhalation, usually involuntarily from drowsiness, fatigue, or boredom.
n.
The act of yawning.

yawn′er n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

yawn

The involuntary opening of mouth to inhale/exhale O2/CO2; thought to be a response to the slowed breathing typical of boredom, exhaustion or sedentary inactivity—which are characterised by increased CO2 and reduced O2 in the circulation—by opening the mouth wide and inhaling deeply, yawns quickly intake O2 and expel CO2 to bring the gases back to normal levels.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

yawn

 The involuntary opening of mouth, often caused by suggestion–“contagious” and accompanied by breathing inward then outward; repeated yawning may indicate drowsiness, depression, or boredom
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

yawn

(yawn)
1. To gape.
2. An involuntary opening of the mouth, usually accompanied by a movement of respiration; it may be a sign of drowsiness or of vital depression, as after hemorrhage, but is often caused by suggestion.
[A.S. gānian]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

yawn

(yawn)
1. To gape.
2. An involuntary opening of the mouth, usually accompanied by inspiration; it may be a sign of drowsiness or of vital depression, as after hemorrhage, but is often caused by suggestion.
[A.S. gānian]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
In the first 1 0 questions specific situations were identified and respondents were asked whether they would be "likely" or "unlikely" to yawn in them, or whether they "don't know." Question 11 asked whether they were more likely to yawn in the morning, afternoon, or evening, and Item 12 asked them whether they could identify any particular time or situation when they yawned more often and to describe it briefly.
Myrberg (1972) found that damselfish Eupomacentrus partitus yawned when making transitions between various social behaviors such as agonistic responses and nest entrances/exits, a finding confirmed by Baenninger (1987) in Siamese fighting fish, Betta splendens.
Nearly 40 percent of participants yawned within the first five minutes outside, but the percentage of summertime yawners dropped to less than 10 percent thereafter.
Babies and toddlers between the ages of 6 and 34 months yawned most after waking in the morning or after naps, but only yawned on average about twice a day.
Only three of the 22 children yawned when they saw a baby yawn on the video.
London, Nov 13 (ANI): An Israeli soldier has been jailed for three weeks because he yawned during an official ceremony.
The soldier, who has not been identified, yawned loudly during a memorial event last week for the late Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin.
Subjects yawned at the same rate, even while being watched by a virtual human avatar or a virtual webcam.
Chances are, though, you yawned while reading this column.