yawn


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yawn

(yawn),
1. To gape.
2. An involuntary opening of the mouth, usually accompanied by inspiration; it may be a sign of drowsiness or of vital depression, as after hemorrhage, but is often caused by suggestion.
[A.S. gānian]

yawn

(yôn)
v. yawned, yawning, yawns
v.intr.
To open the mouth wide with a deep inhalation, usually involuntarily from drowsiness, fatigue, or boredom.
n.
The act of yawning.

yawn′er n.

yawn

The involuntary opening of mouth to inhale/exhale O2/CO2; thought to be a response to the slowed breathing typical of boredom, exhaustion or sedentary inactivity—which are characterised by increased CO2 and reduced O2 in the circulation—by opening the mouth wide and inhaling deeply, yawns quickly intake O2 and expel CO2 to bring the gases back to normal levels.

yawn

 The involuntary opening of mouth, often caused by suggestion–“contagious” and accompanied by breathing inward then outward; repeated yawning may indicate drowsiness, depression, or boredom

yawn

(yawn)
1. To gape.
2. An involuntary opening of the mouth, usually accompanied by a movement of respiration; it may be a sign of drowsiness or of vital depression, as after hemorrhage, but is often caused by suggestion.
[A.S. gānian]

yawn

(yawn)
1. To gape.
2. An involuntary opening of the mouth, usually accompanied by inspiration; it may be a sign of drowsiness or of vital depression, as after hemorrhage, but is often caused by suggestion.
[A.S. gānian]
References in periodicals archive ?
Chances are, though, you yawned while reading this column.
The study determined how each person's motor cortex worked and measured it's "excitability." As the researchers used TMS, it was also possible to increase the "excitability" in the motor cortex and thus even increase people's tendency to contagious yawns.
Yawn posted more than 900 false share drafts and more than 1,200 ACH transactions that led to the credit union losing nearly $500,000.
Both humans and animals yawn, but why this strange behaviour has evolved is still an unsolved mystery.
Plus, the more severe the form of autism, the less likely the child is to yawn contagiously.(10)
According to an evolutionary psychologist, it is contrary to what had been heard informally; dog owners have claimed that they catch their dogs' yawns, but their dogs never yawned when they did.
But only one in five motorists in Yorkshire always take a yawn as a sign to have a rest.
According to a survey commissioned by the soft drink manufacturer, 84% of Americans admit to experiencing an "afternoon slump" every day, about half acknowledge yawning five times a day and 86% feeling that yawns are contagious.
Even seeing a picture of someone yawn, reading the word or thinking about it can cause you to suddenly open your mouth wide.
The physical consequences of the yawn include "opening of the Eustachian tube, tearing, inflating the lungs, stretching, and signaling drowsiness." Yet all of these, Provine says, "may be incidental to its primal function--which may be something as unanticipated as sculpting the articulation of the gaping jaw during embryonic development."
Or will they yawn? Yawns follow a message they've heard often before (a mill crew hearing the foreman announce they must pay more attention to details in safety), or one that has little bearing on their daily lives (that same crew addressed by the CFO on revenues, market share, and profit margins).
Editor Kathy Pories lets 11 intriguing writers loose on the topic of same-sex marriage, reaping an irreverent collection of personal essays that get past the doctrinaire discourse that--let's be honest has made us yawn even though we have everything at stake.--Anne Stockwell, Regina Marler