yaw

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yaw

 [yaw]
1. a lesion of yaws.
2. the deviation of an object from its usual path (see illustration).
Effect of yaw on wounding potential. Yawing is the deviation of a bullet in its longitudinal axis from the straight line of flight. Modified from Swan and Swan, 1980.
mother yaw the initial cutaneous lesion of yaws; called also frambesioma.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

yaw

(yaw),
An individual lesion of an eruption of yaws.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

yaw

Forensics
The angle between the line of flight and a bullet’s long axis; bullets enter tissue and tumble once inside, rotating 180º and exiting with the base forward, which explains the large size of some exit wounds.

Tropical medicine
See Yaws.
 
Vox populi
See Jaws.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

yaw

Forensic pathology The angle between the line of flight and a bullet's long axis; bullets enter tissue and tumble once inside, rotating 180º, and exit with the base forward, which explains the large size of some exit wounds. See Ballistics.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

yaw

(yaw)
An individual lesion of the eruption of yaws.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Assume now that the tire force is aligned with the striation that was deposited by that yawing tire.
Yawing Vehicle Simulation - Full Braking (ABS Disabled)
However, angular momentum reflecting yawing motion to the left during the arm recovery diminished with fatigue.
By establishing methods of quantifying trunk yaw, whole body angular momentum about the vertical axis, and the torques that cause the yawing motion, a foundation for understanding how asymmetrical segmental motions are linked to the yawing motions of a breaststroke swimmer has been established.
Type of stability Speed Crosswind Yaw angle of Focused [km/h] [m/s] incoming flow vehicle [deg] behavior Handling 100-200 0-3 0 Handling at high speed Stability under 100-140 10-20 10-35 Yawing, Lateral the hard crosswind Deviation Stability under 140-200 2-7 2-10 Yaw, Lateral the slight Deviation and crosswind Staggering in roll motion Table 2.
Nor did he remember that with the nose pitched up and at full power, appropriate right rudder pressure is needed to prevent the nose from yawing left due to asymmetric propeller loading (P-factor).
[31] show that for a severe crosswind (>30[degrees]), the quasi-steady approach is unable to capture the overshoot and undershoot of the aerodynamic yawing moment and drag force present in the transient, unsteady static coupling method.
Conventional multi-engine airplanes can require a larger vertical stabilizer and rudder, capable of exerting greater yawing moments, to deal with engine-out situations.
Conventional airplanes have three primary flight controls: ailerons to manage rolling about the longitudinal axis, elevators/stabilators to establish and maintain the desired pitch about the lateral axis, and a rudder to deal with any yawing moments around the vertical axis.
By creating additional lift on the raised wing, we've also increased its induced drag, which has the effect of yawing the airplane in its direction.