yaw

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yaw

 [yaw]
1. a lesion of yaws.
2. the deviation of an object from its usual path (see illustration).
Effect of yaw on wounding potential. Yawing is the deviation of a bullet in its longitudinal axis from the straight line of flight. Modified from Swan and Swan, 1980.
mother yaw the initial cutaneous lesion of yaws; called also frambesioma.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

yaw

(yaw),
An individual lesion of an eruption of yaws.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

yaw

Forensics
The angle between the line of flight and a bullet’s long axis; bullets enter tissue and tumble once inside, rotating 180º and exiting with the base forward, which explains the large size of some exit wounds.

Tropical medicine
See Yaws.
 
Vox populi
See Jaws.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

yaw

Forensic pathology The angle between the line of flight and a bullet's long axis; bullets enter tissue and tumble once inside, rotating 180º, and exit with the base forward, which explains the large size of some exit wounds. See Ballistics.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

yaw

(yaw)
An individual lesion of the eruption of yaws.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The vehicle and moving floor is yawed about the freestream direction, simulation done at three different yaw angles 0[degrees], 2[degrees] and 6[degrees].
One interesting observation is the increasing error as the model is yawed towards the maximum of 9[degrees].
As with the drag the general pattern of the lift distribution is similar whether the car is yawed or not.
In more recent years, dynamically yawed flow has been generated using vertical oscillating airfoils upstream of the test section, as employed by Bearman and Mullarkey [15], Passmore, Richardson and Imam [16], Schroeck et al.