xerography


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xeroradiography

 [ze″ro-ra″de-og´rah-fe]
the making of radiographs by a dry, totally photoelectric process, using metal plates coated with a semiconductor such as selenium; the image produced by this process differs from conventional x-ray in that margins between tissues of varying densities are more clearly defined. Hence, xeroradiography is especially beneficial in the diagnosis of breast tumors. It does, however, require higher doses of radiation. Called also xerography.
negative mode xeroradiography a xeroradiographic image that is blue and white but that has been reversed so that white represents the dense areas.
positive mode xeroradiography a xeroradiographic image that is blue and white, with blue representing the dense areas.

xe·ro·ra·di·og·ra·phy

(zē'rō-rā'dē-og'ră-fē),
Radiography using a specially coated charged plate instead of x-ray film, developing with a dry powder rather than liquid chemicals, and transferring the powder image onto paper for a permanent record; edge enhancement is inherent.
Synonym(s): xerography

xerography

/xe·rog·ra·phy/ (ze-rog´rah-fe) xeroradiography.

xerography

xe·ro·ra·di·og·ra·phy

(zē'rō-rā'dē-og'ră-fē)
Radiography using a specially coated charged plate instead of x-ray film, developing with a dry powder rather than liquid chemicals, and transferring the powder image onto paper for a permanent record; edge enhancement is inherent.
Synonym(s): xerography.

xerography, (zirog´rəfē),

n a dry radiologic process in which an image is made on a metal plate coated with powdered selenium. The plate is electrically charged in a dark room. Exposure to light or roentgen rays causes the charge to be redistributed in a pattern proportional to the intensity of exposure in various areas of the plate. When “developed” in a cloud of charged particles, the particles are attracted to the areas discharged by radiation, producing the equivalent of a photographic negative.

xerography

xeroradiography.
References in periodicals archive ?
Notably, the patents in xerography were all held by Xerox, which
The principle of xerography - producing images on paper using electricity - was developed in 1938 by lawyer-scientist Chester Carlson, who saved future generations from having to deal with carbon paper and mimeograph stencils.
The contract is for the purchase of paper of various sizes and textures for printing and copying: paper for photocopying and xerography, recycled paper, card, coated and uncoated paper.
Because of their unique magnetic and electrical properties and their high thermal and chemical stabilities, these CEMNs have potential value-added applications in magnetic data storage, xerography, electronics, catalysis, and drug delivery (Hsin et al.
The copy used is the Xerography reproduction by University Microfilms International (Ann Arbor, 1977), attributed to C.
The cross-appropriations of the piece suggested a generalized or (possibly generic) cultural event in the process of being repackaged and reassimilated to various media: video, dance, xerography, stenography, post-event Q & A.
Collier (38) for example quotes Barnes' listing of "Neoprene, nylon, polyethylene, silicones, penicillin, Teflon, transistors, xerography, and the Polaroid Land camera" as not resulting from "a market research study of what people said they wanted.
The same year, he joined the Xerox Research Centre of Canada, in Mississauga, ON, where he applied his knowledge of polymer chemistry, physics, and morphology to research activities related to materials for application in xerography, such as organic photoreceptors, toners, and papers.
Bonded ferrite sales are also said to continue to expand, as new high-energy grades open new applications for low cost motors and for new signage, sealing, toy, xerography and sensor/actuator applications.
But like Chester Carlson, whose xerography machine was rejected by 24 corporations, Schwarz has experienced the initial skepticism that new ideas induce.
He used this government experience when he moved over to Xerox, where he negotiated the intricate licensing of xerography patents.
Carlson, the inventor of xerography, will be honored for his process of plain paper copying that revolutionized communications.