xenotransplantation


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xenotransplantation

(zĕn′ə-trăns′plăn-tā′shən, zē′nə-)
n.
The surgical transfer of cells, tissues, or especially whole organs from an organism of one species to an organism of a different species.
The transplantation of an organ from a lower mammal—e.g., baboon, pig—to a higher mammal—e.g., human

xenotransplantation

Xenogeneic transplantation Transplant biology The transplantation of cells or tissues from one species to another; the use of live, nonhuman animal cells, tissues, and organs in humans. See Xenograft.

xenotransplantation

Transplantation of organs from animals, usually transgenic animals, especially pigs, specifically engineered for the purpose. Until recently, no transplanted pig organ had survived for more than a month. But advances in the development of new immunosuppressive agents against xenografts and the identification of the main target for human xenoreactive (anti-pig) antibodies have extended this period to an average of 76 days. Precautions can also be taken against virus transmission. The future for xenotransplantation seems bright.

xenotransplantation

the transplantation of an organ or tissue from an animal of one species to an animal of a different species.
References in periodicals archive ?
Guidance for industry: source animal, product, preclinical, and clinical issues concerning the use of xenotransplantation products in humans.
A human CD46 transgenic pig model system for the study of discordant xenotransplantation.
In summary, xenotransplantation has significant ethical consequences.
Overall, 91% of the students (10/11) reported that they had changed their opinion about xenotransplantation over the course of the unit.
With one of the major technical hurdles and scientific risks overcome, the promise of xenotransplantation is now a reality, with potential to revolutionise the transplant industry, " said Alan Colman, PPL research director.
We have selected xenotransplantation as our case study, based on the timeliness of the issue; the Canadian Public Health Association has recently reported to the federal government on its public consultations designed to determine whether Canada should proceed with xenotransplantation, and if so, under what circumstances.
The benefits of xenotransplantation include a limitless supply of organs, the opportunity to perform transplants electively with shortened waiting periods, and, hopefully, the need for less immunosuppression since the xenograft will necessitate genetic modification to prevent hyperacute rejection.
But the UK Xenotransplantation Interim Regulatory Authority (UKXIRA) has still not received a single serious proposal.
The name given to the inter-special swapping of organs is xenotransplantation and this alternative gives rise to many medical, legal, and ethical problems.
The term xenotransplantation refers to any procedure involving the use of live cells, tissues, or organs from a non-human animal source transplanted or implanted into a human or used for ex vivo (outside the body) contact with human body fluids, cells, tissues, or organs that are subsequently given to a human recipient (Pearson, Jarvis, Folks, & Chapman, 1998; Secretary's Advisory Committee on Xenotransplantation [SACX], 2000).
In the far future, replacement organs may be grown from a person's own cells, but in the near future, organ transplants from animal donors to humans, a process knows as xenotransplantation, will be the best bet, say David K.
For some, the very idea of xenotransplantation, the use of non-human organs for transplant into humans, is unacceptable.