xenophilia


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xenophilia

Sexual arousal evoked by strangers. Once seduced, these strangers lose their sexual appeal.
References in periodicals archive ?
Theodore Eisenberg, Xenophilia or Xenophobia in U.S.
The demographic changes and evidence of xenophobia amongst the native population have forced Greek society to revisit traditional attributes of xenophilia and Greek identity, as well as the conceptualisation of Greek nationality and of Greek 'otherness'.
Thus, while the characteristics of Eurocentric analysis are ethnocentrism (lack of tolerance of other cultures), etnocentrism (lack of tolerance of other races), xenophobia (fear of other races), survival of the Attest, comparativeness, competition, separateness, specialization and compartmentalization, the characteristics of Afrocentric analysis are xenophilia (love of strangers), genophilia (love of one's own race), survival of the group, inclusiveness, co-operation, communalism, responsibility and holism (Goffman,1979).
Recent scholarly concentration on multiculturalism, transculturalism, racism and ethnicity has largely passed by essential issues such as xenophobia and xenophilia. To make up for this oversight, the contributors of this collection of 22 articles investigate the relations of the self and the other in poetry, theory, writing history, textuality, migrant and border narratives, transitional states, diaspora, orientalism, and theater.
Bonnie Honig calls this a strain of xenophilia, which is the positive pair of xenophobia in the binary modes of operation found in conventional views of immigrants (Honig, 2001).
[...] The Western scholar's claim to mastery of things African, albeit motivated by xenophilia rather than xenophobia, risks subjugation of the object to a new set of Western models (121).
She argues that the myth of "immigrant America" is based on a xenophilia for the "good immigrant." According to Honig, the myth of the U.S.
Furthermore, local firms may lack legitimacy in countries with a "long-standing sense of inferiority and xenophilia" (Kostova and Zaheer, 1999: 75).
Diop characterizes Europeans by "patriarchy, treating women as property, xenophobia, materialism, individualism, anomie, ennui, and angst," while Africans are known by "matriarchy, emancipation of women, xenophilia, spiritualism, collectivism and general eudaimonia" [Diop cited in Verharen, "'The New World and the Dreams to Which It May Give Rise': An African and American Response to Hegel's Challenge," Journal of Black Studies 27 (1997), p.
xenophilia, the article contrasts the treatment of refugees and
Kevin Claremont & Theodore Eisenberg, Xenophilia in American Courts, 109 HARV.
I was surprised that no space is devoted to the discourse on the phenomenon of the "English Musical Renaissance" itself, since, as a "received" term, it is thought to be precise and yet is utterly loose in its political and ideological connotations (see Nicholas Temperley, "Xenophilia in British Musical History," in Nineteenth-Century British Music Studies, vol.