xenophilia


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xenophilia

Sexual arousal evoked by strangers. Once seduced, these strangers lose their sexual appeal.
References in periodicals archive ?
See Clermont & Eisenberg, Xenophilia, supra note 144, at 1141-42 (identifying that the median demand was US$73,155 but the median award was US$1,061,064 for foreigners suing domestic entities, and also identifying that the mean demand was US$913,198 and the mean award was US$1,061,064).
625, 650-53 (2007); see also Clermont & Eisenberg, Xenophilia II, supra note 215, at 450-51, 453-55 (discussing Bhattarcharya et al.
Bonnie Honig calls this a strain of xenophilia, which is the positive pair of xenophobia in the binary modes of operation found in conventional views of immigrants (Honig, 2001).
The Western scholar's claim to mastery of things African, albeit motivated by xenophilia rather than xenophobia, risks subjugation of the object to a new set of Western models (121).
Diop characterizes Europeans by "patriarchy, treating women as property, xenophobia, materialism, individualism, anomie, ennui, and angst," while Africans are known by "matriarchy, emancipation of women, xenophilia, spiritualism, collectivism and general eudaimonia" [Diop cited in Verharen, "'The New World and the Dreams to Which It May Give Rise': An African and American Response to Hegel's Challenge," Journal of Black Studies 27 (1997), p.
In highlighting the transnational politics of xenophilia, this
Kevin Claremont & Theodore Eisenberg, Xenophilia in American Courts, 109 HARV.
11) Jurassic Park, The Lost World: Jurassic Park, the Alien tetralogy and Species/Species II point to Hollywood's apparent obsession with depicting anxiety-rendering, uncontrollable female fecundity, as translated and sieved through the sci-fi adventure film genre's xenophobia, xenophilia, and attendant misogynies and racisms.
Charles Rembar, Xenophilia in Congress: Ad Interim Copyright and the Manufacturing Clause, 69 COLUM.
In the West this has induced what elsewhere has been referred to as the "fetishisation of difference" and this produces either a simplistic xenophilia or a vision of Islam "as a cohesive, homogeneous and invariant force," which then becomes "an otherness so radical that it is possible to speak of it as a historical enemy" (p.
This mystique of the foreign man and woman of knowledge has created a pathological case of xenophilia which values things foreign not for their efficacy but simply because of their foreignness.