xenogenesis


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xenogenesis

 [zen″o-jen´ĕ-sis]
2. production of offspring unlike either parent.

xenogenesis

/xeno·gen·e·sis/ (-jen´ĕ-sis)
2. the hypothetical production of offspring unlike either parent.

xenogenesis

(zĕn′ə-jĕn′ĭ-sĭs, zē′nə-)
n.
The supposed production of offspring markedly different from either parent.

xen′o·ge·net′ic (-jə-nĕt′ĭk), xen′o·gen′ic (-jĕn′ĭk) adj.

xenogenesis

[zen′əjen′əsis]
1 alternation of traits in successive generations; heterogenesis.
2 the theoretic production of offspring that are totally different from both of the parents. xenogenetic, xenogenic, adj.

xenogenesis

1. heterogenesis (1).
2. production of offspring unlike either parent.
References in periodicals archive ?
Butler's Xenogenesis trilogy--Dawn (1987), Adulthood Rites (1988), Imago (1989) (1)--is set approximately two hundred and fifty years after a nuclear war on Earth.
Smith, "Morphing, Materialism, and the Marketing of Xenogenesis," Genders 18 (Winter 1993): 67-86.
Frances Bonner 'Difference and Desire, Slavery and Seduction: Octavia Butler's Xenogenesis Trilogy' Foundation 48 (Spring 1990): 50-62.
His topics include cytogenetics and sex chromosomes, gynogenesis and consequences, triploidy and sterility, allogenesis and xenogenesis, sex change and hermaphroditism, and genetic sex determination.
The articles here cover the range of Butler's work, from the earliest Patternist series, through the Xenogenesis and Parable series, the short stories of Bloodchild, and then to Butler's final novel, Fledgling.
Tucker develops this view of Butler by examining the nature of cultural identity in her Xenogenesis sequence, where African-American history is melded with SF figures of racial and species difference.
There was my fascination for the science fiction presentation of cancer as a barely conscious potential for transformation, integral to our humanity, a theme in Octavia Butler's trilogy Xenogenesis.
Broad opens the final section with "Body Speaks: Communication and the Limits of Nationalism in Octavia Butler's Xenogenesis Trilogy" by pondering how the limits of communication result in colonial tensions between humanity and the alien Oankali in Octavia Butler's late 1980s series.
In an interview with McCaffery, conducted just as she had completed Xenogenesis, Butler says that the seeds of the Xenogenesis story can be traced to Ronald Reagan's idea of a "winnable" nuclear war:
Among their topics are epistemology, cultural negotiation, the black female world of Octavia Butler's Xenogenesis Trilogy, ecology and evolution in Dan Simmons' Hyperion Cantos, and political myths and social reality in East German science fiction 1949-89.
that Octavia Butler's Xenogenesis trilogy (1987-89) was "designed largely as a critique of the aggressive policies of the Reagan administration" (35).