xenodiagnosis

(redirected from xenodiagnostic)
Also found in: Dictionary.

xenodiagnosis

 [zen″o-di″ag-no´sis]
1. diagnosis by means of finding, in the feces of clean laboratory-bred bugs fed on the patient, the infective forms of the organism causing the disease; used in the early stages of Chagas' disease.
2. diagnosis of trichinosis by means of feeding laboratory-bred rats or mice on meat suspected of being infected with Trichinella, and then examining the animals for the parasite. adj., adj xenodiagnos´tic.

xen·o·di·ag·no·sis

(zen'ō-dī'ag-nō'sis),
1. A method of diagnosing acute or early Trypanosoma cruzi infection (Chagas disease) in humans. Infection-free (laboratory-reared) triatomine bugs are fed on the patient's tissue and the trypanosome is identified by microscopic examination of the bug's intestinal contents after an incubation period.
2. A similar method of biologic diagnosis based on experimental exposure of a parasite-free normal host capable of allowing the organism in question to multiply, enabling it to be more easily and reliably detected.

xenodiagnosis

(zĕn′ə-dī′əg-nō′sĭs, zē′nə-)
n. pl. xenodiagno·ses (-sēz)
Diagnosis of an infectious disease at an early stage by exposing a presumably infected individual or tissue to a clean, laboratory-bred mosquito, tick, or other vector and then examining the vector for the presence of the infective microorganism.

xen′o·di·ag·nos′tic (-nŏs′tĭk) adj.

xen·o·di·ag·no·sis

(zen'ō-dī'ăg-nō'sis)
1. A method of diagnosing acute or early Trypanosoma cruzi infection (Chagas disease) in humans. Infection-free triatomine insects are permitted to feed on the person thought to be infected, and the trypanosome is identified by microscopic examination of the intestinal contents of the insect after a suitable incubation period.
2. A similar method of biologic diagnosis based on experimental exposure of a parasite-free normal host capable of allowing the organism in question to multiply, enabling it to be more easily and reliably detected.
References in periodicals archive ?
To establish that these birds had not already been infected by Lyme disease spirochetes, nymphs derived from xenodiagnostic larval deer ticks that had engorged on them were examined by dark-field microscopy.
Xenodiagnostic larval ticks were permitted to feed on these robins nine times during the study.
Birds were exposed initially to xenodiagnostic larvae at the same time they were exposed to the infecting nymphs.
Infectivity to larval deer ticks of four American robins infected with tickborne Lyme disease spirochetes Days from Xenodiagnostic ticks exposure until No.
(a) Each interval indicates the days on which xenodiagnostic ticks detached from their hosts.
Virtually all xenodiagnostic larval ticks that fed on three of these reinfected birds acquired spirochetes, and a third of them did so on the fourth bird.
Two weeks later, 10 xenodiagnostic larval ticks were permitted to engorge on each of these mice.
We then identified the spirochete genospecies that naturally infected rodents transmitted to xenodiagnostic larvae.
Natural infectivity for xenodiagnostic Ixodes ricinus ticks of various genospecies of Lyme disease spirochetes No.
afzelii is the sole spirochete genospecies infecting these rodents, xenodiagnostic observations indicate that samples based on ear biopsies do not reflect the total diversity of spirochetes infecting such a rodent.