xenodiagnosis


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xenodiagnosis

 [zen″o-di″ag-no´sis]
1. diagnosis by means of finding, in the feces of clean laboratory-bred bugs fed on the patient, the infective forms of the organism causing the disease; used in the early stages of Chagas' disease.
2. diagnosis of trichinosis by means of feeding laboratory-bred rats or mice on meat suspected of being infected with Trichinella, and then examining the animals for the parasite. adj., adj xenodiagnos´tic.

xen·o·di·ag·no·sis

(zen'ō-dī'ag-nō'sis),
1. A method of diagnosing acute or early Trypanosoma cruzi infection (Chagas disease) in humans. Infection-free (laboratory-reared) triatomine bugs are fed on the patient's tissue and the trypanosome is identified by microscopic examination of the bug's intestinal contents after an incubation period.
2. A similar method of biologic diagnosis based on experimental exposure of a parasite-free normal host capable of allowing the organism in question to multiply, enabling it to be more easily and reliably detected.

xenodiagnosis

/xeno·di·ag·no·sis/ (-di″ag-no´sis) a method of animal inoculation using laboratory-bred bugs and animals in the diagnosis of certain parasitic infections when the infecting organism cannot be demonstrated in blood films; used in Chagas' disease (examination of the feces of clean bugs fed on the patient's blood) and trichinosis (examination of rats to which the patient's muscle tissue has been fed).xenodiagnos´tic

xenodiagnosis

(zĕn′ə-dī′əg-nō′sĭs, zē′nə-)
n. pl. xenodiagno·ses (-sēz)
Diagnosis of an infectious disease at an early stage by exposing a presumably infected individual or tissue to a clean, laboratory-bred mosquito, tick, or other vector and then examining the vector for the presence of the infective microorganism.

xen′o·di·ag·nos′tic (-nŏs′tĭk) adj.

xenodiagnosis

[-dī·agnō′sis]
a method of diagnosing a vector-transmitted infection such as Chagas' disease, in which a laboratory-reared, pathogen-free insect is allowed to suck blood from a patient. The intestinal contents of the insect are then examined for the presence of the pathogen.

xen·o·di·ag·no·sis

(zen'ō-dī'ăg-nō'sis)
1. A method of diagnosing acute or early Trypanosoma cruzi infection (Chagas disease) in humans. Infection-free triatomine insects are permitted to feed on the person thought to be infected, and the trypanosome is identified by microscopic examination of the intestinal contents of the insect after a suitable incubation period.
2. A similar method of biologic diagnosis based on experimental exposure of a parasite-free normal host capable of allowing the organism in question to multiply, enabling it to be more easily and reliably detected.

xenodiagnosis

1. diagnosis by means of finding, in the feces of clean laboratory-reared, parasite-free arthropod vectors allowed to feed on the host suspected of being infected by a protozoan, the infective forms of the organism causing the disease; used in diagnosis of trypanosomiasis.
2. diagnosis of trichinosis by means of feeding laboratory-bred rats or mice on meat suspected of being infected with Trichinella, and then examining the animals for the parasite.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Chronic Chagas disease: from xenodiagnosis and hemoculture to polymerase chain reaction.
Xenodiagnosis was positive for one 31-year-old female at the 30th day of treatment and positive for another 58-year-old female on the 60th day of treatment, indicating treatment failure (Table 1).
During the acute phase of infection, diagnosis involves detection of circulating organisms by microscopic examination of a fresh blood specimen or stained blood smear, hemoculture, or xenodiagnosis (1).
Detection of Trypanosoma cruzi in blood specimens of chronic chagasic patients by Polymerase Reaction Chain amplification of kinetoplast minicircle DNA: Comparison with serology and xenodiagnosis.
The present communication discusses the use of mosquitoes for propagation and assays of arboviruses and xenodiagnosis.
This study's approach of characterizing Borrelia infection of ticks engorged on birds is analogous to xenodiagnosis, which is commonly used in assessing reservoir competence in the laboratory (17).
Other diagnostic tests used include xenodiagnosis (examination of rectal contents of laboratory-raised reduviid bugs after they take a blood meal from a suspect person or inoculation of human blood into laboratory animals) or PCR tests.
Previous reports have focused on the high sensitivity of PCR test when compared to serologic findings, xenodiagnosis, or blood culture.
Xenodiagnosis A diagnostic technique in which uninfected arthropods are allowed to feed on a suspect individual and then examined in an attempt to recover the parasite.
henselae in these ticks might represent a highly sensitive form of xenodiagnosis.