xanthelasma


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xanthelasma

 [zan″thĕ-laz´mah]
xanthoma affecting the eyelids and characterized by soft yellowish spots or plaques.

xan·the·las·ma pal·pe·bra·rum

soft, yellow-orange plaques on the eyelids or medial canthus, the most common form of xanthoma; may be associated with low-density lipoproteins, especially in younger adults.

xanthelasma

Fatty skin growth Dermatology A condition characterized by multiple 1-2 mm yellowish plaques–lipid-laden histiocytes surrounding blood vessels, formally, xanthomas of the inner eyelid, commonly seen in normocholesterolemic elderly, or hypercholesterolemic younger persons. See Xanthoma.

xan·the·las·ma pal·pe·bra·rum

(zanthĕ-lazmă palpē-brārŭm)
Soft, yellow-orange plaques on the eyelids or medial canthus, the most common form of xanthoma; may be associated with elevation of low-density lipoproteins, especially in younger adults.
Synonym(s): xanthelasma.

xanthelasma

(zan″thĕ-laz′mă) [ xantho- + Gr. elasma, (metal) plate]
Enlarge picture
XANTHELASMA
A xanthoma on the eyelids, esp. near the inner canthus. See: illustration

xanthelasma

Cholesterol deposits in the eyelid skin, near the inner corner of the eye, appearing as unsightly, raised, yellow plaques that enlarge slowly. Xanthelasma does not necessarily imply raised blood cholesterol, but this should be checked to eliminate the dangerous condition of familial hypercholesterolaemia, of which it is a feature. Plaques of xanthelasma can easily be removed but tend to recur.

xanthelasma 

A cutaneous deposition of lipid material that appears in the skin of the eyelids, most commonly near the inner canthi. It appears as a yellowish, slightly elevated area. It is a benign and chronic condition that occurs primarily in the elderly. It may be associated with raised blood cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein and triglyceride levels, leading to heart disease or diabetes. Syn. xanthoma; xanthelasma palpebrarum; xanthoma palpebrarum. See corneal arcus; Hollenhorst's plaque.
References in periodicals archive ?
Xanthelasma laser ablation procedure was convenient and well tolerated by all treated patients.
Cutaneous Manifestations of Diabetes (n = 60) Cutaneous Manifestations Number (%) Infections 30 50% Diabetic dermopathy 12 20% Foot changes 6 10% Skin tags 5 8.32% Acanthosis nigricans 4 6.67% Xanthelasma 2 3.34% palpebrarum Cherry angioma 1 1.67% pie chart 1: cutaneous manifestations among the study population (n=75) cutaneous manifestation 15(20%) no skin involvement 60(80%) Note: Table made from pie chart.
The review concluded that "sufficient evidence is available to suggest laser therapies to be a cosmetically excellent treatment option for xanthelasma, particularly applicable in patients who are not good candidates for surgical excision," he said.
In our study common skin disorders associated with diabetes were acrochordons (17.7%), xerosis (13.7%), candidal infection (10.3%), dermatophytic infections (9%), eczemas (6.3%), acanthosis (5.3%), diabetic foot (4.7%), pityriasis versicolor (4.7%), xanthelasma (3.7%) and vitiligo (2.3%).
Uraz et al., "Xanthomatous hyperplastic polyps of the stomach: Clinicopathologic study of 5 patients with polypoid gastric lesions showing combined features of gastric xanthelasma and hyperplastic polyp," Annals of Diagnostic Pathology, vol.
Tuberous xanthomas or xanthelasmas are waxy-appearing growths that may look yellow or orange and appear to be pasted on the skin in areas around the face, commonly the eyelids.
They explained the lack of women cases in the study, provided the time period of their data collection, described clearly parameters such as hair loss score, xanthelasma, hair thinning, etc.
Eleven cases had hypercholesterolaemia; eight had xanthoma, one had xanthelasma, two had hypo pigmentation, three had corneal arcus, one had lipaemia retinalis and six had cardiac manifestations among which one case had myocardial infarction and one case died.
In the FH cohort (whose mean age at presentation was 44 years), 80% had tendon xanthomata, 36% had arcus cornealis, and 14% had xanthelasma. Tendon xanthomata was present in almost 90% of patients by the age of 50 years.
The common non-infective dermatoses observed in the study were xerosis (54.9%), senile ichthyosis (29.5%), dermatosis papulosa nigra (24%) (figure 3), acrochordon (24.4%), cherry angioma (17.1%) (figure 4), seborrhoeic keratoses (17.8%), colloid milia (13.1%), macular amyloidosis (10.5%), senile comedones (9.1), senile ecchymosis (4.7%) (Figure 5), lichen simplex chronicus (4.7%), fissure foot (12%), non-healing ulcers (1.5%), xanthelasma palpebrarum (figure 6), prurigo nodularis, psoriasis, bullous pemphigoid, longitudinal ridging of nails, oral submucosal fibrosis.
The cases that most of the residents diagnosed correctly were numbers 01 (xanthogranuloma), 02 (sarcoidosis), 07 (tattoo) and 10 (xanthelasma) for the ND domain, and for the SV domain, they were cases 02 (blister above scar) and 03 (dermatitis herpetiformis).
* Xanthelasma. These are benign, yellow macules, papules, or plaques that tend to appear on the eyelids.