X-ray crystallography

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Related to X-ray diffraction: scanning electron microscope, Bragg's law, XRD

crystallography

 [kris″tah-log´rah-fe]
the science dealing with the study of crystals.
x-ray crystallography the determination of the three-dimensional structure of molecules by means of diffraction patterns produced by x-rays of crystals of the molecules.

X-ray crystallography

a powerful technique for determining the structure of crystalline substances by measuring the diffraction patterns produced when a beam of X-rays is passed through the crystal. X-ray crystallography has provided information on the 3-D structure of PROTEINS, NUCLEIC ACIDS, DRUGS, HORMONES, VITAMINS and so on, from which atomic models can be built. Knowledge of the structure of such molecules has provided insight into how they function, and is useful in PROTEIN ENGINEERING.
References in periodicals archive ?
D., "Elements of X-ray Diffraction", Second Edition, Addison-Wesley, Reading Massachusetts, 1978.
Cullity, Elements of X-Ray Diffraction, Reading, Mass, USA, Addison-Wesley edition, 1978.
Ermolaev, "Study of the structure of vanadium pentoxide gel X-ray diffraction method, Com," in Materials XIII International Baykonurov Readings at O.A.
Harris and White (2007) stressed x-ray diffraction technique for soil minerals identification and explained its importance as "X-ray diffraction (XRD) is the technique most heavily relied in soil mineralogical analysis.
These technological problems were successively analyzed and experimentally verified on selected sample materials (scientifically according to surface integrity-residual stress measurement by the X-ray diffraction method) and also tested in serial production of long-produced parts.
In addition, control blown film samples were also formed, one with a diameter of 2.2 cm (small) and another with a diameter of 8 cm (large), for offline X-ray diffraction experiments.
X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques have long been used for characterization of a wide variety of substances and are typically nondestructive methods of investigation.
However, x-ray diffraction determined this structure to be acicular ferrite and carbon-enriched austenite or ausferrite.
As well as their roles within the company, they have collectively published more than 400 scientific articles and co-authored a book entitled, `High Resolution X-ray Diffraction and Topography'.
The three-dimensional coordinates of the crystal are obtained by X-ray diffraction. The coordinates can be recorded on a computer readable medium, or are part of a video memory, where they can be used as part of a system for studying for studying TACE.
On page 4, the author stated "Minerals, especially small-sized ones, commonly are identified using x-ray diffraction and spectrographic techniques.
Key words: crystallite size; diffraction line broadening; dislocations; nickel; recrystallization; x-ray diffraction.