wryneck


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torticollis

 [tor″tĭ-kol´is]
a contracted state of the cervical muscles, producing torsion of the neck; the deformity may be congenital, hysterical, or secondary to conditions such as pressure on the accessory nerve, inflammation of glands in the neck, or muscle spasm. Called also wryneck.
Torticollis. From Dorland's, 2000.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

tor·ti·col·lis

(tōr'ti-kol'is), [MIM*189600]
A contraction, or shortening, of the muscles of the neck, chiefly those supplied by the accessory nerve (NXI); the head is drawn to one side and usually rotated so that the chin points to the other side.
See also: dystonia.
Synonym(s): wry neck, wryneck
[L. tortus, twisted, + collum, neck]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

wryneck

(rī′nĕk′)
n.
b. A person with torticollis.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
A focal dystonia consisting of one-sided contracture with palpable induration of the sternocleidomastoid muscle, causing the chin to turn towards the opposite side and the head to rotate towards the lesion; wryneck is accompanied by facial muscle dysplasia
Aetiology Congenital form—unclear—possibly due to in utero or peripartum trauma to venous drainage, causing asymmetric development of the face and skull; the later it is recognised, the more likely it will require surgery
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

wryneck

Congenital torticollis, torticollis A focal dystonia consisting of one-sided contracture awith palpable induration of the sternocleidomastoid muscle, causing the chin to turn towards the opposite side and the head to rotate towards the lesion; WN is accompanied by facial muscle dysplasia Etiology Congenital form– unclear–possibly due to in utero or peripartum trauma to venous drainage, causing asymmetric development of the face and skull; the later WN is recognized, the more likely surgical intervention is required
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

wryneck

See TORTICOLLIS.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
"Wrynecks are very rare and this was the first record for Lock's Common.
A prime characteristic of the wryneck, Jynx torquilla, is an ability to turn its head almost 180 degrees.
Older fruit trees have nestholes for tits, tree sparrows and the rare wryneck, which has ceased to breed in England.
Three Snow Geese, of unknown origin, were on Anglesey's Alaw estuary and a Little Gull flew past Bardsey, where a Wryneck and Buffbreasted Sandpiper were seen last week.
Other species of international conservation concern found in the traps were Great Reed Warbler, Nightjar, Golden Oriole, Wryneck, several species of shrikes, flycatchers and the local subspecies of the Scops Owl for which Cyprus has a special responsibility.
HMS Wryneck was hit shortly after the bedraggled soldier was dragged on board.
The long-staying long-tailed duck is still on Llyn Trawsfynydd, while a wryneck was briefly at Rhoscolyn.
* A rare sighting of a wryneck, from the woodpecker family, was made by David Hall, of Matfen in Northumberland.
Up to 10 Spotted Redshanks and a Great White Egret are at Connah's Quay nature reserve, an Ortolan Bunting and Wryneck were found on Bardsey last Friday.
"I could see the Wryneck steaming away in the distance on fire and sinking and HMS Diamond bobbing like a cork in the distance then sinking below moment memory The m picked called H to Crete.
Sooty and Balearic shearwaters, long-tailed skuas and more black terns were blown close to Bardsey, where a wryneck remained all week and a Western Bonelli's warbler dropped in on Thursday.