writing-to-learn

writing-to-learn

 
an instructional strategy in which writing is coordinated with the learning of content and development of cognitive skills such as critical thinking rather than simply with editorial skills.
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Therefore, this study concludes that the development of prospective teachers' belief systems can increase the quality of writing-to-learn and the strategies used for such activities.
Focusing on the use of informational texts, she discusses how and why content connections must be made, changes in literacy learning, and the standards; the types of printed and digital texts available, their strengths and weaknesses, and how to locate and select them; the foundational skills of print concepts, phonological awareness, phonics, and word recognition, and how they fit with the standards and can connect with content; text complexity, how to assess it, and related issues; vocabulary development and content knowledge; and nurturing writing-to-learn skills for opinion pieces, informational texts, and narrative texts.
This article introduces a writing-to-learn activity called 'Writing an argument to a real audience' in which students craft an evidence-based argument consisting of claims and evidence to persuade the audience regarding their ideas.
In particular, they speculated that integrating writing-to-learn activities might provide a consistent method to shore up the teaching of content in their subject areas, offsetting--as one teacher put it--the school district's predilection for "prescribing fad-of-the-month gimmicks to bolster test scores.
In turn, he explains how students can use writing-to-learn metacognition tools in science courses to critically examine how they relate their conceptual frameworks to learning new material.
This writing-to-learn activity allows the instructor to monitor students' preconceptions about upcoming subjects or units.
The writing-to-learn movement is fundamentally about using words to acquire concepts.
Robert Bangert-Drowns and colleagues conducted a meta-analysis of 48 school-based writing-to-learn programs in 2004.
Much of his criticism is connected to the use of process-expressivist writing-to-learn strategies that he argues are owned by composition.
The technique can be used in any disciplinary or multidisciplinary learning environment where writing-to-learn is used as a pedagogical technique.
Five years ago, when I joined a collaborative teacher-researcher group at Hughes Intermediate School to explore teaching and learning, I came across a research question that changed my teaching forever: Can writing-to-learn strategies improve the achievement of students in my science classes?
Prain and Hand (1996) argued several interacting factors must be considered when developing effective writing-to-learn activities that will lead to more than simple recall.