woven bone


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Related to woven bone: lamellar bone

wo·ven bone

bony tissue characteristic of the embryonal skeleton, in which the collagen fibers of the matrix are arranged irregularly in the form of interlacing networks.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

woven bone

(wō′vən)
n.
Bony tissue characteristic of the embryonic skeleton in which the collagen fibers of the matrix are arranged irregularly in the form of interlacing networks.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

wo·ven bone

(wō'vĕn bōn)
Bony tissue characteristic of the embryonal skeleton, in which the collagen fibers of the matrix are arranged irregularly in the form of interlacing networks.
Synonym(s): nonlamellar bone, reticulated bone.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

wo·ven bone

(wō'vĕn bōn)
Bony tissue characteristic of the embryonal skeleton, in which the collagen fibers of the matrix are arranged irregularly in the form of interlacing networks.
Synonym(s): nonlamellar bone, reticulated bone.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
For example, skeleton 262 had extensive new bone formation and severe enamel hypoplasia; skeleton 338 had severe marrow hyperplasia, woven bone on multiple skeletal elements, and evidence of scurvy; skeleton 208 had sinusitis and cuspal enamel hypoplasia as defined by Ogden et al.
On histological analysis, curved spicules of woven bone are seen amongst a background of extensive fibrosis, sometimes with large resorptive lacunae walled with osteoclasts.
The intrabony defects were mostly occupied by lamellar bone and woven bone, and the height of newly formed bone was more than that in the OFD group.
Following a surgical trauma, for example, insertion of an implant, a healing process is initiated where bone formation progresses from a poorly organised woven bone phase to a remodelled lamellar structure [24], where the tissue is highly organised on the micrometre and nanometre length scales in adaptation to local biomechanical conditions [15, 25, 26].
As shown in Figures 3 and 4, woven bone combined with lamellar bone was observed in direct contact with the implant surface without the presence of fibrous tissue, although small microgaps were noted between the bone and the implant.
The osteogenic areas are composed of long trabeculae of woven bone associated with the same proliferation of fusiform stromal cells in the intertrabecular spaces.
The tissues present in the defect were composed of 23 [+ or -] 2% of the lamellar bone, 28 [+ or -] 1% of the woven bone, and 56 [+ or -] 4% of the marrow spaces.
Luxuriate in Indigo West's super-soft Egyptian cotton bath sheets ($98), store your trinkets in its woven bone decorative box ($495) and set a romantic mood with a candle in its own silvery cup ($35) and white ceramic vases finished with gold leaf interiors ($466 a pair) from The Sarasota Collection Home Store.
Increased holding power and anchorage of implant as time proceeded may reflect change in the structure of bone located close to the implant with increased maturation by time for both Sr and HA as this process is normal physiological process, Robert et al, stated that "after insertion of an implant, a poorly organized woven bone with low strength is formed at the interface then maturation of woven bone to lamellar one with adequate strength take about 6 weeks" (22) (Figure 5).
In osteoblastma there are anastamosing trabeculae of osteoid and woven Bone, rimmed by single layer of benign osteoblasts.
Polarization will show woven bone. These changes can also be seen in fibrous dysplasia, hyperparathyroidism, giant-cell tumor, and infantile cortical hyperostosis.