world view

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world view

 [werld vu]
the perspective a culture takes of the world, which is shared by cultural group members. Though not always overtly recognized, world views influence health and illness beliefs and behavior; for example, a world view of harmony and balance shapes a view of health as a balance of natural forces, a world view that is largely technological leads to a view of illness analogous to the breakdown of a machine, and a world view focusing on fear and violence shapes a perception of illness as the result of evil forces.
References in periodicals archive ?
Our narrative is actually imbedded in our worldview. Introducing and including philosophy in our curriculum can be helpful in creating a society where people tolerate and listen to others, where they live in peace without hating and threatening others for having different worldviews.
Education on cultural competency, however, continues to suffer from two key weaknesses: the failure of a conceptual basis for connecting cultural and race specific forces, and the failure to recognize differences in worldviews that people may subscribe (cf.
In traditional indigenous cultures still operating under our original worldview, people grow up learning about complementarity between apparent opposites and seek it out.
Using Adobe Connect as our "classroom," I spent a few lectures each semester talking with my students about worldview and how it influences or colors our understanding of everything else in life.
According to TMT, threats to worldview include mortality salience (i.e., death awareness) and alternative worldviews.
We now interpret the four mechanical worldviews through Neutrosophy, for issues related to the effect of "gravity" and "repulsion", and the like.
Hiebert, Transforming Worldviews: An An thropological Understanding of Hozv People Change (Grand Rapids: Baker, 2008), 315, emphasis added.
There was a part of me that wanted to go back and surround myself with individuals who supported the same exact worldview that I had growing up and was comfortable with.
This is the starting point of Ned O'Gorman's Spirits of the Cold War, an exploration of four early Cold War worldviews. Through a critical reading of primary source material against philosophy and intellectual history, O'Gorman analyzes how major players in Eisenhower's administration reflected and reified deeply embedded worldviews of American foreign policy discourse: stoicism, evangelicalism, adventurism, and romanticism.
Hiebert attempts to form a paradigm or template through which one can understand humanity in general and also more local human expressions by constructing systems around different worldviews.
Constructing worldviews demands a driving force, what Webb calls "existential eros." He points to indications of this impetus for growth in Becker, Jaspers, Piaget, Kierkegaard, Ricoeur, and Lonergan.
Dixon, "African-oriented and Euro-American-oriented worldviews: Research Methodologies and Economics," Review of Black Political Economy 7, no.

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