work practice controls

work practice controls

Occupational safety An OSHA term for controls that ↓ the risk of exposure–to blood-borne pathogens–by altering the manner in which a task is performed–eg, prohibition of 2-handed needle recapping, mouth pipetting, other high-risk practices
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Subsequent engineering and work practice controls can be implemented with a defined goal of reducing exposure during specific tasks that have been shown to contribute significantly to overall exposure.
It describes the steps that employers are required to take to protect employees from hazards associated with silica dust in the workplace, including assessing worker exposures; using engineering and work practice controls to keep exposure levels below a specified safety threshold; and, offering medical exams to certain highly exposed workers.
In order to prevent LAIs, engineering controls, work practice controls, and PPE should always be employed.
In the efforts to protect waterborne paints from microbial growth, manufacturers have enhanced plant hygiene and developed work practice controls that ensure product integrity throughout the supply chain.
Education, acceptance and engagement of staff on the use of safety devices as well as selection of safer, user-friendly safety devices and focused work practice controls are critical to reduce injury.
A similar adoption by MSHA could mean that mining operators are subject to the same requirements for engineering and work practice controls.
A successful policy should also include engineering, administrative and work practice controls or actions to reduce or eliminate the hazards, including a review of the proper use of lifting aids and when to use these devices; education and training of workers and management and an effective disciplinary system.
Provide respiratory protection: (1) where exposures exceed the PEL during periods necessary to install or implement feasible engineering and work practice controls; (2) where exposures exceed the PEL during work operations for which engineering and work practice controls are not feasible; (3) during work operations for which an employer has implemented all feasible engineering and work practice controls and such controls are not sufficient to reduce exposures to or below the PEL; and (4] during periods when the employee is in a regulated area or when an access control requires use of a respirator.
Employers must comply with the OSHA Bloodborne Pathogens Standard, which requires a written exposure control plan, use of engineering and work practice controls, appropriate personal protective equipment, and provision of hepatitis B vaccine to employees assigned to jobs with occupational exposure risk (2).
22) This required compliance with elements such as exposure control plans, use of standard (universal) precautions, engineering and work practice controls, post-exposure follow-up and prophylaxis, and prohibition of high-risk practices such as recapping.
The law requires employers to use work practice controls and engineered safety devices to minimize or eliminate the risk of exposure.