wool

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wool

(wul),
The hair of the sheep; sometimes, when defatted, used as a surgical dressing.
Synonym(s): lana

wool

the natural fiber produced by the skin of domesticated sheep, characterized by its quality of felting together by virtue of its imbricated surface.

wool ball
black wool
inherited coat color in sheep.
wool blind
the state of having excess wool growth around the eyes to the point where the sheep is unable to see.
break in wool
see wool break.
carding wool
wool suitable for the woollen trade.
carpet wool
coarse low-grade wool, used in the manufacture of carpets.
wool classing
see wool classing.
clean wool
the basis on which the price of wool is set; scoured wool less charges and loss incurred in scouring.
combing wool
long-fibered wool suitable for processing in a combing machine. Used in textile manufacture, especially worsted.
colored wool fibers
naturally colored fibers in a fleece.
dead wool
wool plucked from a sheep which has been dead for some time; usually heavily contaminated and of little value.
dense wool
staples carrying many fibers per unit area of skin surface.
wool depigmentation
wool discoloration
see fleece rot, mycotic dermatitis.
doggy wool
unevenly or poorly crimped wool; found in old sheep.
wool eating
eating of rabbits' wool by other rabbits, or wool from garments by cats causes intestinal wool balls and obstruction of the gut. May be a manifestation of pica due to boredom.
wool fat
see lanolin.
wool fiber abnormalities
includes straight, steely wool, wool break, pigmentation, achromotrichia in black sheep.
wool fiber diameter
thickness of the fiber; wool is sold on the basis of the average fiber diameter of the wool in the lot as determined by a machine and quoted in microns (micrometers); a more sophisticated classification is made on the basis of the average fiber diameter and the variability of the diameter.
greasy wool
wool in its natural state, after removal from the sheep and before any commercial processing; contains yolk, suint, moisture, extraneous soil and vegetable matter.
wool hairs
the soft undercoat fibers in most cats and dogs, interspersed with the longer guard hair; the predominant fiber type in sheep.
hogget wool
first fleece from a 10 to 14 month old sheep which has not been previously shorn.
hunger fine wool
wool with a finer fiber diameter than expected for the sheep's age; caused usually by poor nutrition.
wool industry
includes sheep farming, shearing, wool sales, wool processing and fiber and fabric manufacture.
wool maggots
see cutaneous myiasis.
wool picking
pulling at the wool of another sheep. It may be a vice due to over-confinement, or to an unspecified nutritional deficiency. Biting of another sheep as occurs in rabies may be confused with wool picking but not for long.
plain wool
straight wool lacking crimp and character.
wool processing effluent
liquid effluent from wool processing; has been a source of infection with anthrax.
wool pulling
pulling by the sheep of its own wool, usually an indication of itchiness. See also psorergatesovis.
wool quality
the British standard for wool quality is based on the Bradford Spinning Count System and the wool qualified as to its Bradford Count. This originated in the 19th century and is based on the number of 560-yard worsted skeins that can be produced from one pound of clean wool; larger numbers mean finer wool.
wool rot
see fleece rot.
wool rubbing
the sheep rubs its fleece against a hard object. Usually an indication of itching caused by external parasites or to a systemic disease with manifestations in the skin. See also scrapie.
wool slip
alopecia of housed ewes that are shorn in winter. The wool is lost over a large area of the back. There is no systemic illness and the wool regrows normally. The cause is unknown but the condition appears to be related to a high level of serum corticosteroids.
straight-steely wool
wool sucking
a vice of cats, particularly Siamese and Siamese crosses, in which they suck or chew woollen objects. Believed to be an extension of sucking behavior.
tender wool
wool which will break during the combing process in manufacturing.
wool wax
see lanolin.
wool weight
see fleece weight.
wool yield
the percentage of raw wool that can be retrieved from processing in a state suitable for the particular type of production which is in hand, e.g. carpet making.
References in periodicals archive ?
There are labs all over the world not just making woolly mammoths but doing things that 10 years from now are going to have huge repercussions.
The implication of the old idea that woolly mammoths were hunted to extinction is that people are bad at managing common resources.
An international expedition to the Lyakhovsky Islands led by scientists from Russia's North-Eastern Federal University in Yakutsk has discovered six specimens of woolly mammoth fossils suitable for extracting DNA.
Still, quality Nintendo Wii U games aren't exactly piling up at the moment and Yoshi's Woolly World has enough refreshing ideas to make it more than worth unravelling.
Post divided the woolly hair nevus into three categories: a) Type 1: with no associated scalp disorder or hair less skin, b) Type 2: with associated linear verrucous nevus, c) Type 3: acquired, in young adults with short, dark, kinky hair, which has been termed acquired progressive kinking of scalp hair.
Gooch uses a hand lens to look at hemlock woolly adelgids on a hemlock tree branch at the park, far left photo.
Thanks to the woolly hat and other treatment, the patient was now recovering well, the hospital revealed.
Julie and Caroline Davis, who run her local wool shop, Christine's, in Bournville, have helped his mother Anne make the woolly poppies.
Betsy's not short of relatives on the Woolly and Tig set.
London, June 13 ( ANI ): Not long after the last ice age, the last woolly mammoths succumbed to a lethal combination of climate warming, encroaching humans and habitat change - the same threats facing many species today, a new study has claimed.
According to new research, nearly half of people in Yorkshire and the Humber have received a woolly present for Christmas that they have never worn or only worn once or twice.