wood tick


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Related to wood tick: Lyme disease, American dog tick

wood tick

n.
Any of various ticks of the genus Dermacentor that occur in wooded areas, infest mammals, and transmit the microorganisms that cause Rocky Mountain spotted fever and tularemia in humans.

tick

(tik)
Any of numerous bloodsucking arthropods of the order Acarida and superfamily Ixodoidea. Ticks transmit many diseases to humans and animals. See: Argasidae; Ixodidae

wood tick

Dermacentor andersoni.
References in periodicals archive ?
This disease can be contracted anywhere the wood tick is found.
Most cases have been reported among girls aged <10 years during April-June, when nymphs and mature wood ticks are most prevalent (2).
Three ixodid tick species are important vectors in the United States: the American dog tick (Dermacentor variabilis), the Rocky Mountain wood tick (D.
rickettsii in the Rocky Mountain wood tick, Dermacentor andersoni (13).
Both sub-adult stages of the wood tick Ixodes ricinus infrequently co-infest mice and voles in nature; on approximately 1 in 20 small rodents, larvae co-feed with spirochete-infected nymphs.
CTF is caused by a coltivirus that is transmitted by infected Rocky Mountain wood ticks (Dermacentor andersoni) (2).
It is carried by two species of deer ticks (as opposed to wood ticks), Ixodes scapularis and Ixodes pacificus.
In this area, Rocky Mountain spotted fever is spread by American Dog Ticks, brown dog ticks and Rocky Mountain wood ticks (Dermacentor andersoni).
Barry says: Repel wood ticks with dryer sheets We say: Hmm.
He once saved us from a bear and has slept with us in our beds since he's been with us, except in the summer-we don't like wood ticks! -Kaitlyn Goenner, Clear Lake, MN
So, mostly, our fishing trip involved leech handling, disagreeing about the identity of wood ticks (spiders she insisted, and in a way she was right because they are eight-legged arthropods) and losing crawlers to bait-stealing redhorse, a small member of the sucker family that likely accounts for the muskies growing so large in this river.
The common wood ticks that burrow into one's skin and back out with a little prompting are a spring variety and not present now.