wood pulp


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wood pulp

A soft form of cellulose, derived from wood or cotton, used as a food additive. Humans cannot digest it.
See also: pulp
References in periodicals archive ?
The International Agency for Research on Cancer in February 1997 announced its findings that the most biologically potent of dioxins - 2,3,7,8-tetra-chlorodibenzo-para-dioxin (TCDD) - is carcinogenic to humans and frequently found in wood pulp.
Asia has also become an important consumer and importer of wood pulp.
His system passes an electric current through a saltwater bath containing 10 percent wood pulp.
Wood pulp, consisting of cellulose fibers made from wood, is the most frequently used fiber in the world.
Sheets from bleached wood pulp were prepared after fluorescein sodium was added, together with solutions of transition metals as well as methyl cellulose, cellulose sulfate, starch, and kaolin.
Disposable product manufacturer RMED International, Westport, CT, recently developed a disposable diaper designed to achieve fluid absorbency through a wadding batt layer consisting solely of a combination of cotton and wood pulp, rather than through a wadding batt layer with wood pulp and a superabsorbent polymer or other form of chemical absorbent.
The EPA study showed that mills using chlorine to bleach their wood pulp create dioxins and furans that can end up in the paper.
Contents include: raw materials--cotton, wood pulp, and bonding nonwovens; product attributes--home use materials, operating room materials, meeting quality requirements, and specialized uses; and performance testing--prosthesis materials, diapers, biobarrier properties of packaging materials used in medical devices, sterile medical device packaging, packaging and medical device recalls, and automated testing.
Kimberly-Clark, Dallas, TX, recently revealed plans to sell off three wood pulp mills and related operations as part of plans to move out of the pulp business.
There has been a growing governmental effort to reduce--or even eliminate--the use of chlorine during treatment of wood pulp in the U.