witness

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witness

Pseudomedicine
A body sample (e.g., a spot of blood or strand of hair) that is believed by the practitioners of radionics to be able to transmit vibrational energies from its owner.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

witness

Choice in dying A person who is not a spouse or blood relative of a dying Pt; employees of health care facilities, who act in good faith, can act as witnesses with regard to end-of-life decisions Forensic medicine
1. A person who has seen an act.
2. A person qualified by education and/or experience to testify as to a thing. See Expert witness, Physician expert witness.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Patient discussion about witness

Q. I HAVE HAD TROUBLE WIT MY SPEECH, SINCE A KID, AND CANT FIND A JOB TROUBLE WITH MY SPEECH

A. How old are you now?
What are your interests?
Are you sure the problem getting a job is your speech and not the way to dress or present yourself?
What other jobs have you held in the past and what happened to them?
I can think of a few places I have run into people with speech problems, such as the cable man or a waitress at a local restaurant. Consider asking a speech therapist what kinds of jobs other people with your particular problem hold.

More discussions about witness
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References in periodicals archive ?
Non-relatives have seen someone dying or being killed - perhaps the most traumatic event they've ever witnessed."
This means clearing it of unnecessary personnel and identifying and interviewing all individuals previously present to determine whether they were involved in or witnessed the crime, as well as if and how they may have contaminated or altered the scene.
In assessing live testimony that comes years after the event, the fact-finder must thus allow for the effects of time in distorting the events witnessed.