carbonate

(redirected from witherite)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

carbonate

 [kahr´bon-āt]
a salt of carbonic acid.

car·bon·ate

(kar'bŏn-āt),
1. A salt of carbonic acid.
2. The ion CO32-.

car·bon·ate

(kahr'bŏn-āt)
1. A salt of carbonic acid.
2. The ion CO32-.

car·bon·ate

(kahr'bŏn-āt)
A salt of carbonic acid.

Patient discussion about carbonate

Q. hi my name is ray i am from england and i am on oxygen i am a retainer of carbon monxide do you guys know whoa any place working with stem cell or natural medical emial rsantolla@aol.co.uk

A. i had a whole course on stem cell use in tissue engineering and from what i know this is an area that still in research and very little clinical use. the ability to create lungs from Mesenchimal Stem Cells is a far away dream right now. but here are some links to labs that research that area:
http://organizedwisdom.com/Stem_Cells_for_Emphysema

More discussions about carbonate
References in periodicals archive ?
Although the solubility product values of calcite and witherite are very close, about [10.sup.-83]-[10.sup.85] subjected from temperatures, witherite as a member of the aragonite group is less stable than calcite, and during dissolution its saturation in solution will not be reached.
Following the 1889 meeting of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, for example, he made the rounds in Cumberland with "a leading mineralogist," acquiring "butterfly" calcite, barite, fluorite, witherite, alstonite.
However, when the higher barium-content witherite from nearby Nentsberry came onto the market, the demand for the lower-quality Blagill material disappeared and there are no production records after 1895.
He said: "I've kept three scrap books of old photographs, old drawings of the mine workings, pieces of Witherite and I've still got the sign from one of the steam engines in the Ellen Shaft.
Although exploratory work revealed good witherite ore in the lower 90 feet of the old lead workings, witherite was never mined there.
The Hilton mine is unusual in being situated on the margin of the fluorite zone, where barite and witherite would normally have predominated.
In the 1850s the Caldbeck mines were yielding wonderful lead and copper minerals, and some of the world's finest fluorite and witherite was being found in abundance in the Northern Pennines.
Catalog C once contained several specimens of witherite from Anglezark in Lancashire, where it was first found in the late 18th century, though only Georgiana's specimens from Arkendale in Yorkshire have been identified to date.
The Baumann prospect, once explored for its barite potential in the late 1920's, hosts a number of barium minerals including alforsite, barite, bazirite, benitoite, celsian, fresnoite, hyalophane, krauskopfite, macdonaldite, sanbornite, titantaramellite, walstromite, witherite and two new minerals which are currently under study.
Associated minerals are: celsian, fresnoite, macdonaldite, pyrrhotite, titantaramellite, traskite, witherite, two new minerals and a hydrated form of Si[O.sub.2].
The mineral deposits which lie beneath the Pennine Hills of Northern England have been mined for centuries and are known to collectors worldwide for fine specimens of fluorite, barite and witherite. The ancient lead mining district of Alston Moor, which lies on the northwestern edge of the North Pennines, has also furnished exceptional examples of two mineralogical rarities: the barium-calcium carbonates alstonite and barytocalcite.
But the gallery is totally lacking in fine barite, bournonite, witherite and liroconite, and even the Weardale fluorites left much to be desired.