withdrawal

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withdrawal

 [with-draw´al]
1. a pathological retreat from interpersonal contact and social involvement, as may occur in avoidant, schizoid, or schizotypal personality disorders.
2. the removal of something.
3. a substance-specific substance-induced disorder that follows the cessation of use or reduction in intake of a psychoactive substance that had been regularly used to induce a state of intoxication. Specific withdrawal syndromes include those for alcohol, amphetamines or similarly acting sympathomimetics, cocaine, nicotine, opioids, and sedatives, hypnotics, or antianxiety agents. Called also abstinence syndrome, withdrawal symptoms, and withdrawal syndrome.



The usual reactions to alcohol withdrawal are anxiety, weakness, gastrointestinal symptoms, nausea and vomiting, tremor, fever, rapid heartbeat, convulsions, and delirium (see also delirium tremens). Similar effects are produced by withdrawal of barbiturates and in this case convulsions occur frequently, often followed by psychosis with hallucinations. Treatment of withdrawal consists of providing a substitute drug such as a mild sedative, along with treatment of the symptoms as needed. Parenteral fluids are often required.
substance withdrawal withdrawal (def. 3).
withdrawal syndrome former name for withdrawal (def. 3).
thought withdrawal the delusion that someone or something is removing thoughts from one's mind.

with·draw·al

(with-draw'ăl),
1. The act of removal or retreat.
See also: withdrawal symptoms, withdrawal syndrome.
2. A psychological and/or physical syndrome caused by the abrupt cessation of the use of a drug in an habituated person.
See also: withdrawal symptoms, withdrawal syndrome.
3. The therapeutic process of discontinuing a drug to avoid the symptoms of withdrawal (2).
See also: withdrawal symptoms, withdrawal syndrome.
4. A pattern of behavior observed in schizophrenia and depression, characterized by a pathologic retreat from interpersonal contact and social involvement and leading to self-preoccupation.
See also: withdrawal symptoms, withdrawal syndrome.

withdrawal

(wĭth-drô′əl, wĭth-)
n.
1.
a. Discontinuance of the use of a drug or other substance, especially one that is addictive.
b. The physiological and mental reaction to such discontinuance, often characterized by distressing symptoms: is going through withdrawal from opioids.
2. Coitus interruptus.

withdrawal

The participant-/subject-/patient-initiated act of ending participation in a clinical study, which can range from complete withdrawal from study procedures and follow-up to withdrawal from study-related interventions, while permitting continued access to his or her medical records or identifiable information.

Per FDA regulations, when a subject withdraws from a study, the data collected on the subject to the point of withdrawal remain part of the study database and may not be removed.

withdrawal

Psychology A retreat from interpersonal contact, which may be a normal reaction–eg, to uncomfortable social situations or unemployment, or a sign of mental disorders–eg, schizophrenia, depression, bipolar disorder Substance abuse A specific constellation of signs and Sx due to the abrupt cessation of, or reduction in, regularly administered opioids; opioid withdrawal is characterized by 3 or more of the following Sx that develop within hrs to several days after abrupt cessation of the substance:
1. Dysphoric mood,.
2. N&V,.
3. muscle aches & abdominal cramps,.
4. lacrimation or rhinorrhea,.
5. pupillary dilation, piloerection or sweating,.
6. diarrhea,.
7. yawning,.
8. fever,.
9. insomnia. See Alcohol withdrawal syndrome, Physical dependence.

with·draw·al

(with-draw'ăl)
1. The act of removal or retreat.
2. A psychological and physical syndrome caused by the abrupt cessation of the use of a drug in a habituated person.
3. The therapeutic process of discontinuing a drug so as to avoid withdrawal (2).
4. A pattern of behavior observed in schizophrenia and depression, characterized by a pathologic retreat from interpersonal contact and social involvement and leading to self-preoccupation.
5. Synonym(s): coitus interruptus.

Withdrawal

Those side effects experienced by a person who has become physically dependent on a substance, upon decreasing the substance's dosage or discontinuing its use.

with·draw·al

(with-draw'ăl)
1. Act of removal or retreat.
2. Psychological and/or physical syndrome caused by abrupt cessation of use of a drug in an habituated person.
3. Therapeutic process of discontinuing a drug to avoid the symptoms of withdrawal.

Patient discussion about withdrawal

Q. ALCOHOL WITHDRAWAL what are the symtoms of it?

A. thank you dagmar--i hope this answer will help people to understand what this drug can do to you---peace---mrfoot56

Q. I may be healthier now, but miserable… I’ve not been smoking for a whole month (my longest period in the last decade), and I do feel a bit better physically, but it seems that I lost the joy of life – I don’t go out with my friends any more (because they’re all smokers), I envy other smokers, and generally I feel nervous and dull. Will it be like that forever or is there hope?

A. Well, try to think about what are you missing? The foul smell? The yellow teeth? The feeling of suffocating next morning? Whenever you feel longing to cigarettes, try to think again why you stopped smoking- and it’d help you to keep with it.

More discussions about withdrawal
References in periodicals archive ?
Sun Bank Guaranteed Investment Certificate 3 Years 01438 744 500 6.25% 3 years no withdrawals during term
If you withdraw the funds after age 59.5 and the first contribution was made five years ago, then the withdrawal is tax- and penalty-free under all circumstances.
As previously discussed, there is a 10% penalty tax for easy withdrawals from an IRA, and the rules for IRAs do not include as many exceptions to this penalty as other qualified plans.
To complicate matters further, while a buyer of assets is not liable for the debts and liabilities of the seller under general common law successor liability principles, several recent courts have held that asset buyers may be responsible for asset sellers' withdrawal liability under a successor liability theory.
The new rule effectively lowers the allowable daily US Dollar withdrawal amount from USD5,000 to USD3,000.
Sources have told Zee Media, the Central Board of Trustees (CBT) in a crucial meeting on April 13, will discuss options to allow interest-free partial withdrawal to the employees who are without any jobs for over two months.
As further evidence of RMD rules being a major force behind withdrawal decisions, only 19% of people who took a withdrawal owned a Roth IRA, which aren't subject to RMD rules.
For whom might a systematic withdrawals approach be suitable?
Some days later, however, I received a letter from the bank explaining, rather tersely I thought, that the word 'free' in the context of the notice to which I referred, referred not to the cash but to the withdrawal. "The money," it said, "has correctly been deducted from the balance, but you have not been charged for making the withdrawal.
As many colleges reduced the cutoffs for popular courses, transfers have led to many withdrawals.
Sainsbury's Bank predicts a 1.3% rise in cash withdrawals compared with December last year to reach a total of PS11.1bn, due to an increased number of ATMs across the country, resulting in increased accessibility.
If the accounts have performed very well, using the 4 percent approach may unduly restrict Tom and Sophie's withdrawals each year.