withdrawal syndrome


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Related to withdrawal syndrome: Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome, neonatal withdrawal syndrome

withdrawal

 [with-draw´al]
1. a pathological retreat from interpersonal contact and social involvement, as may occur in avoidant, schizoid, or schizotypal personality disorders.
2. the removal of something.
3. a substance-specific substance-induced disorder that follows the cessation of use or reduction in intake of a psychoactive substance that had been regularly used to induce a state of intoxication. Specific withdrawal syndromes include those for alcohol, amphetamines or similarly acting sympathomimetics, cocaine, nicotine, opioids, and sedatives, hypnotics, or antianxiety agents. Called also abstinence syndrome, withdrawal symptoms, and withdrawal syndrome.



The usual reactions to alcohol withdrawal are anxiety, weakness, gastrointestinal symptoms, nausea and vomiting, tremor, fever, rapid heartbeat, convulsions, and delirium (see also delirium tremens). Similar effects are produced by withdrawal of barbiturates and in this case convulsions occur frequently, often followed by psychosis with hallucinations. Treatment of withdrawal consists of providing a substitute drug such as a mild sedative, along with treatment of the symptoms as needed. Parenteral fluids are often required.
substance withdrawal withdrawal (def. 3).
withdrawal syndrome former name for withdrawal (def. 3).
thought withdrawal the delusion that someone or something is removing thoughts from one's mind.

with·draw·al syn·drome

the development of a substance-specific syndrome that follows the cessation of, or reduction in, intake of a psychoactive substance that the person previously used regularly; for example, clinical syndrome of disorientation, perceptual disturbance, and psychomotor agitation following the cessation of chronic use of excessive quantities of alcohol is termed alcohol withdrawal syndrome. The syndrome that develops varies according to the psychoactive substance used. Common symptoms include anxiety, restlessness, irritability, insomnia, and impaired attention.
See also: abstinence syndrome, withdrawal, withdrawal symptoms.

with·draw·al syn·drome

the development of a substance-specific syndrome that follows the cessation of, or reduction in, intake of a psychoactive substance that the person previously used regularly; for example, clinical syndrome of disorientation, perceptual disturbance, and psychomotor agitation following the cessation of chronic use of excessive quantities of alcohol is termed alcohol withdrawal syndrome. The syndrome that develops varies according to the psychoactive substance used. Common symptoms include anxiety, restlessness, irritability, insomnia, and impaired attention.
See also: abstinence syndrome, withdrawal, withdrawal symptoms.

withdrawal syndrome

Etymology: ME, with + drawen, to take away; Gk, syn, together, dromos, course
a physical and mental response after cessation or severe reduction in intake of a substance such as alcohol or opiates that has been used regularly to induce euphoria, intoxication, or relief from pain or distress. The body tissues become dependent on the regular reinforcing effect of the chemical so that interruption of the dosage induces an organic mental state characterized by anxiety, restlessness, insomnia, irritability, impaired attention, and often physical illness. Also called abstinence syndrome.

withdrawal syndrome

Cardiology A constellation of findings, including angina and acute MI, that may follow abrupt cessation of β-blockers in Pts with HTN Psychology See Withdrawal Substance abuse A constellation of Sx that follow the abrupt cessation of psychoactive agents, which is largely a function of the withdrawn agent.

with·draw·al syn·drome

(with-draw'ăl sin'drōm)
A substance-specific syndrome that follows the cessation of, or reduction in, intake of a psychoactive substance previously used regularly. The syndrome that develops varies according to the psychoactive substance used. Common symptoms include anxiety, restlessness, irritability, insomnia, and impaired attention.

withdrawal syndrome

The complex of symptoms experienced on withdrawal of a drug on which a person is physically dependent. Symptoms of heroin withdrawal include craving for the drug, restlessness, depression, running nose, yawning, pain in the abdomen, vomiting, diarrhoea, loss of appetite, sweating and gooseflesh (‘cold turkey’). Those caused by withdrawal of other narcotic drugs are similar but less intense. See also DETOXIFICATION UNDER ANAESTHESIA.

with·draw·al syn·drome

(with-draw'ăl sin'drōm)
Development of a substance-specific syndrome that follows cessation of, or reduction in, intake of a psychoactive substance that the person previously used regularly; e.g., clinical syndrome of disorientation, perceptual disturbance, and psychomotor agitation following cessation of chronic use of excessive quantities of alcohol is termed alcohol withdrawal syndrome.
References in periodicals archive ?
Acute withdrawal syndrome related to the administration of analgesic and sedative medications in adult intensive care unit patients.
When possible, benzodiazepines should be avoided in the first trimester because of possible teratogenicity and then again late in the third trimester before delivery because of neonatal withdrawal syndromes.
Think of the response as a kind of pendulum effect; the further the pendulum has been pushed to the depressed side with alcohol abuse or dependence, the further it will swing back to the hyperactive side when alcohol ingestion has ceased, causing a more serious withdrawal syndrome.
In addition to physical signs of withdrawal, a constellation of symptoms contributing to a state of distress and psychological discomfort constitute a significant component of the withdrawal syndrome (Anton and Becker 1995; Roelofs 1985; Schuckit et al.
Hypofunction of the serotonergic pathway is thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of ethanol dependence and ethanol withdrawal syndrome, and a relationship with NO has also been noted.
These revealed, for the first time, a high level of agitation, nervousness and extreme restlessness among volunteers - the symptoms believed to be associated with acts of violence and self-harm - and clear evidence of a withdrawal syndrome.
The scientists also noted that no withdrawal syndrome has been documented in babies exposed to cocaine or methamphetamine in utero.
6) Other studies should identify preexisting and co-existing neurobiological, psychosocial, and environmental factors that significantly impact treatment outcomes; 7) determine and examine the physiology of withdrawal from inhalants, including the study of potential treatments to ameliorate any withdrawal syndrome and determine if different classes of inhalants induce different withdrawal syndromes; 8) develop and improve methods for diagnosing, treating, and increasing physician awareness of inhalant abuse, overdose, and poisoning, including research aimed at developing and improving analyses for inhalants that can be used in medical emergency care or other settings; 9) develop and/or test medications currently used or under development for other drug dependencies (e.
The fully-developed benzodiazepine withdrawal syndrome is a combination of severe sleep disturbance, irritability, increased tension and anxiety, panic attacks, hand tremor, profuse sweating, difficulty in concentration, dry retching and nausea, weight loss, palpitations, and muscular pains and stiffness.
Alcohol withdrawal syndrome (AWS) consists of a spectrum of clinical manifestations that vary in severity and duration upon cessation of alcohol intake in the alcohol-dependent patient.