withdrawal syndrome


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withdrawal

 [with-draw´al]
1. a pathological retreat from interpersonal contact and social involvement, as may occur in avoidant, schizoid, or schizotypal personality disorders.
2. the removal of something.
3. a substance-specific substance-induced disorder that follows the cessation of use or reduction in intake of a psychoactive substance that had been regularly used to induce a state of intoxication. Specific withdrawal syndromes include those for alcohol, amphetamines or similarly acting sympathomimetics, cocaine, nicotine, opioids, and sedatives, hypnotics, or antianxiety agents. Called also abstinence syndrome, withdrawal symptoms, and withdrawal syndrome.



The usual reactions to alcohol withdrawal are anxiety, weakness, gastrointestinal symptoms, nausea and vomiting, tremor, fever, rapid heartbeat, convulsions, and delirium (see also delirium tremens). Similar effects are produced by withdrawal of barbiturates and in this case convulsions occur frequently, often followed by psychosis with hallucinations. Treatment of withdrawal consists of providing a substitute drug such as a mild sedative, along with treatment of the symptoms as needed. Parenteral fluids are often required.
substance withdrawal withdrawal (def. 3).
withdrawal syndrome former name for withdrawal (def. 3).
thought withdrawal the delusion that someone or something is removing thoughts from one's mind.

with·draw·al syn·drome

the development of a substance-specific syndrome that follows the cessation of, or reduction in, intake of a psychoactive substance that the person previously used regularly; for example, clinical syndrome of disorientation, perceptual disturbance, and psychomotor agitation following the cessation of chronic use of excessive quantities of alcohol is termed alcohol withdrawal syndrome. The syndrome that develops varies according to the psychoactive substance used. Common symptoms include anxiety, restlessness, irritability, insomnia, and impaired attention.
See also: abstinence syndrome, withdrawal, withdrawal symptoms.

with·draw·al syn·drome

the development of a substance-specific syndrome that follows the cessation of, or reduction in, intake of a psychoactive substance that the person previously used regularly; for example, clinical syndrome of disorientation, perceptual disturbance, and psychomotor agitation following the cessation of chronic use of excessive quantities of alcohol is termed alcohol withdrawal syndrome. The syndrome that develops varies according to the psychoactive substance used. Common symptoms include anxiety, restlessness, irritability, insomnia, and impaired attention.
See also: abstinence syndrome, withdrawal, withdrawal symptoms.

withdrawal syndrome

Etymology: ME, with + drawen, to take away; Gk, syn, together, dromos, course
a physical and mental response after cessation or severe reduction in intake of a substance such as alcohol or opiates that has been used regularly to induce euphoria, intoxication, or relief from pain or distress. The body tissues become dependent on the regular reinforcing effect of the chemical so that interruption of the dosage induces an organic mental state characterized by anxiety, restlessness, insomnia, irritability, impaired attention, and often physical illness. Also called abstinence syndrome.

withdrawal syndrome

Cardiology A constellation of findings, including angina and acute MI, that may follow abrupt cessation of β-blockers in Pts with HTN Psychology See Withdrawal Substance abuse A constellation of Sx that follow the abrupt cessation of psychoactive agents, which is largely a function of the withdrawn agent.

with·draw·al syn·drome

(with-draw'ăl sin'drōm)
A substance-specific syndrome that follows the cessation of, or reduction in, intake of a psychoactive substance previously used regularly. The syndrome that develops varies according to the psychoactive substance used. Common symptoms include anxiety, restlessness, irritability, insomnia, and impaired attention.

withdrawal syndrome

The complex of symptoms experienced on withdrawal of a drug on which a person is physically dependent. Symptoms of heroin withdrawal include craving for the drug, restlessness, depression, running nose, yawning, pain in the abdomen, vomiting, diarrhoea, loss of appetite, sweating and gooseflesh (‘cold turkey’). Those caused by withdrawal of other narcotic drugs are similar but less intense. See also DETOXIFICATION UNDER ANAESTHESIA.

with·draw·al syn·drome

(with-draw'ăl sin'drōm)
Development of a substance-specific syndrome that follows cessation of, or reduction in, intake of a psychoactive substance that the person previously used regularly; e.g., clinical syndrome of disorientation, perceptual disturbance, and psychomotor agitation following cessation of chronic use of excessive quantities of alcohol is termed alcohol withdrawal syndrome.
References in periodicals archive ?
Clinical study on heroin withdrawal syndrome treated by scalp acupuncture in addicts.
Several studies have been performed in the field of morphine withdrawal syndrome, in which various opioids such as naltrexone, dextromethorphan, methadone, tramadol, and buprenorphine were used as morphine replacement.
In conclusion, the acute administration of the PDE5 inhibitor sildenafil during naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal syndrome significantly reduced withdrawal symptoms.
40% in STT experiencing AWSz African-American (AA); Alcohol (ETOH); Alcohol Withdrawal Seizures (AWSz); Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome (AWS); Benzodiazepine (BNZD); Blood Alcohol Level (BAL); Charleston Comorbidity Index (CCI); Clinical Institute Withdrawal Assessment for Alcohol-revised (CIWA-Ar); Critical Care (CC); Cut down, Annoyed, Guilty, Eye Opener (CAGE); Delirium Tremens (DTs); Intensive Care Unit (ICU); Intravenous (IV); Length of Stay (LOS); Length of Treatment (LOT); Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (MOS-SF-36); Milligrams (mg); Non-Critical Care (NCC); Prescribed (rx); Symptom-triggered Therapy (STT); Time from Last Drink (TFLD); Trauma Intensive Care Unit (TICU) FIGURE 1.
The withdrawal syndrome showed markedly shorter duration than the craving (Figures 1A, 1D), which, unfortunately, is not listed within the BWASQ2.
4) when substance use is reduced or ceased, as evidenced by the characteristic withdrawal syndrome for the substance, or use of the same (or closely related) substance with the intention of relieving or avoiding withdrawal symptoms.
Some people do suffer from something called serotonin withdrawal syndrome, which can include headaches, dizziness or electric shock-like feelings when they stop their medicines too abruptly.
Bethany then developed Baclofen withdrawal syndrome, sending her muscles into violent spasms and causing the fatal rhabdomyolysis.
This volume consists of eight regular-length and one short article on Substance Withdrawal Syndrome, its physiological and psychological symptoms.
Spiegel and Radac recently described cases in which adding the anticonvulsants (valproic acid, levetiracetam or gabapentin) to benzodiazepines in patients experiencing alcohol withdrawal syndrome yielded better outcomes than seen with benzodiazepines alone.