aconite

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aconite

 [ak´ah-nīt]
an extremely toxic substance from the dried root of Aconitum napellus (monkshood or wolfsbane), containing several closely related alkaloids, principally aconitine. It has variable effects on the heart leading to heart failure and it also affects the central nervous system; poisoning can be fatal, and with large doses death may be instantaneous. It was formerly used as an antipyretic and cardiac and respiratory depressant and topically as a counterirritant and local anesthetic.

ac·o·nite

(ak'ō-nīt),
The dried root of Aconitum napellus (family Ranunculaceae), commonly known as monkshood or wolfsbane; a powerful and rapid-acting poison formerly used as an antipyretic, diuretic, diaphoretic, anodyne, cardiac and respiratory depressant, and externally as an analgesic.

aconite

(ăk′ə-nīt′)
n.
1. Any of various usually poisonous perennial herbs of the genus Aconitum in the buttercup family, having tuberous roots, palmately lobed leaves, and blue, purple, or white flowers with a large hoodlike upper sepal.
2. The dried leaves and roots of some of these plants, which yield a poisonous alkaloid that was formerly used medicinally. In both senses also called monkshood, wolfsbane.

aconite

Herbal medicine
An alkaloid derived from the plant by the same name, which formerly had currency as a medicinal herb; given aconite’s toxicity, it is no longer used in herbal medicine.

Toxicity
Abdominal pain, anxiety, blurred vision, bradycardia, burning sensation, cardiac arrhythmias, chest pain, diaphoresis, dyspnoea, impaired speech, muscular weakness, nausea, paresthesias, vertigo, vomiting, and possibly death due to respiratory failure or ventricular fibrillation.

Management
Gastric lavage, atropine, digitalis.
 
Homeopathy
A homeopathic remedy for treating swelling, fever, infections, restlessness, anxiety and panic attacks, and parasthesias; it has also been used for anginal pain, arrhythmias, arthritis, asthma, bronchitis, respiratory infections, laryngitis, sore throat, toothaches. In homeopathy, aconite’s concentration is extremely low, thus reducing its potential toxicity.

ac·o·nite

(ak'ŏ-nīt)
The dried root of Aconitum napellus (family Ranunculaceae), commonly known as wolfsbane; a powerful and rapid-acting poison formerly used as an antipyretic, diuretic, diaphoretic, anodyne, cardiac and respiratory depressant, and externally as an analgesic.
Synonym(s): fu tzu, monkshood.
[L. aconitum, fr. G. akoniton]

aconite

A poisonous mixture of alkaloids derived from the roots of the plant Aconitum napellus . Also known as Wolf's bane, Monskhood and Friar's cowl. Aconite is no longer used in medicine.
References in periodicals archive ?
Winter aconite THIS hardy perennial with small, knobbly tubers produces vibrant yellow flowers above a ruff of bright green leaves in winter, just at a time when everything else is dull and dank.
For smaller spaces, or as underplantings, invest in a few winter-flowering bulbs, such as Eranthis (the winter aconite with starry, golden yellow flowers), snowdrops, early crocus and miniature iris.
On the rock garden Cyclamen coum is in full bloom alongside the Winter Aconite and Ive no less than ten different snowdrops just waiting to burst open their three petalled flower pods.
With the coming of spring in late March and early April, crocuses, winter aconite, and green leaves of daffodils and tulips are seen newly emerging.
given us an early Christmas this year because I have had reports that the snowdrops are out in Beaumont Park, there is a forsythia in flower in Shelley and I have recently seen a winter aconite in flower in North Yorkshire, one month before it should.
Arnott' with a backdrop of Lenten hellebores and some winter aconite (Eranthis hyemalis) and you have a winner.
Winter aconite: Bright yellow cuplike blooms flower March to April.
Best of the Bunch Winter aconite LONG before the buttercups in your lawn start to flower, there is a tiny early spring flowering relative that gives us the same flower colour and can give the garden a real lift if planted in large enough blocks.
Earlier, during January and February, the winter aconite (Eranthis hyemalis) creates pools of gold.
Put a spread of the white GS Arnott with a backdrop of Lenten hellebores and some winter aconite (Eranthis hyemalis) and you have a winner.
EASY Clear leaves and debris from borders underplanted with snowdrops and winter aconites so flowers show.
Honey-scented Galanthus elwesii makes an excellent cut flower while the pretty petal-packed double variety Flore Pleno looks striking in clumps between patches of lungwort, hellebores and winter aconites. Buy from specialist nurseries as "in the green" bulbs and plant straight away.