wing


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to wing: wind, Bing

wing

(wing),
1. One of the vertebrate forelimbs adapted for flying, as in bats and birds.
2. Any appendage adapted for flying, as in insects.
3. Any flattened, laterally projecting process.
Synonym(s): ala (1)
[Fr. Middle English winge, wenge, from Old Norse vaenger, wing]

wing

(wĭng)
n.
1. Any of various paired movable organs of flight, as that of a bird or insect.
2. Something that resembles a wing in appearance, function, or position relative to a main body.

wing

(wing) [TA]
1. The anterior appendage of a bird.
2. anatomy Ala (q.v.).
[Fr. Middle English winge, wenge, from Old Norse vaenger, wing]

wing

  1. either of the modified fore limbs of a bird that are covered with large feathers and specialized for flight in most species.
  2. one of the organs of flight of an insect, consisting of a membranous outgrowth from the thorax containing a network of veins.
  3. either of the organs of flight in certain other animals, especially the forelimb of a bat.

wing

(wing) [TA]
Any flattened, laterally projecting process.
Synonym(s): ala.
[Fr. Middle English winge, wenge, from Old Norse vaenger, wing]
References in classic literature ?
On the grassy bank Wing Biddlebaum had tried again to drive his point home.
Out of the dream Wing Biddlebaum made a pic- ture for George Willard.
In one corner was a pile of human skulls reaching almost to the ceiling and in another a stack of dried Wieroo wings. The chamber was as irregularly shaped as the other and had but a single window and a second door at the further end, but was without the exit through the roof and, most important of all, there was no creature of any sort in it.
As Bradley stood flattened against the wall waiting for the Wieroo to move on, he heard the creature's wings brushing against the sides of the buildings as it made its way down the narrow passage in his direction.
The many-colored shadows of the fairest flowers played on the pure white walls, and fountains sparkled in the sunlight, making music as the cool waves rose and fell, while to and fro, with waving wings and joyous voices, went the smiling Elves, bearing fruit and honey, or fragrant garlands for each other's hair.
Delicate and graceful were the little forms, bright the silken hair that fell about each lovely face; and Eva heard the low, sweet murmur of their silvery voices and the rustle of their wings. She gazed in silent wonder, forgetting she knew not who they were, till the Fairy said,--
"I'll get you the wings," said Zeb, who had thoughtfully listened to all this.
"Now, Eureka, you'll have to show me the way to those wings."
You want to wear your wings, you know, and your other things."
And the Gump obeyed, slowly and gracefully waving its four wings in the air until the Thing had settled once more upon the roof and become still.
I was with the Philadelphia Institute expedition in the Bad Lands under Professor Cope, hunting mastodon bones, and I overheard him say, his own self, that any plantigrade circumflex vertebrate bacterium that hadn't wings and was uncertain was a reptile.
Then, with a great deal of chattering and noise, the Winged Monkeys flew away to the place where Dorothy and her friends were walking.