wind

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wind

anemophobia.

wind

pronounced WIN'd Vox populi The rushing of air from one point to another, generally induced by differences in land temperature. See Fire wind.

wind

A popular term for the result of air swallowing by greedy babies. Air swallowed along with a feed becomes compressed by PERISTALSIS and may cause COLIC and much crying. Slower feeding, dill water and silicone polymer oils, to reduce surface tension and form froth, are helpful.

Patient discussion about wind

Q. second wind My cousin is an experienced aerobic for nearly 2 years. She does vigorous exercises. How a ''second wind'' affects her and what is it?

A. The term ‘second wind is mostly known to the people who are related to the fitness. No matter how fit you are, the first few minutes into vigorous exercise you'll feel out of breath, and your muscles may ache. Your body isn't able to transport oxygen to the active muscles quickly enough. As a result, your muscles burn carbohydrates an aerobically, causing an increase in lactic acid production. Gradually, your body makes the transition to aerobic metabolism and begins to burn nutrients (carbohydrates and fats) aerobically. This shift over to aerobic metabolism coincides with your getting ''back in stride'' (a.k.a. the ''second wind''). The more you train and the more fit you become, the sooner you will get your ''breath'' back and reach an aerobic steady state that you can maintain for a relatively extended duration.

More discussions about wind
References in classic literature ?
If the wind held as it was, the chances would be in her favour.
The pilot put up his poles, but took them down again within two hours, as the wind freshened up anew.
It was very dark, and the wind howled horribly around her, but Dorothy found she was riding quite easily.
Three days they had to wait before the West wind came.
So she wasn't easily frightened, whatever happened, and when the wind began to howl and whistle, and the waves began to tumble and toss, our little girl didn't mind the uproar the least bit.
"Listen to th' wind wutherin' round the house," she said.
But Juag only seized his paddle more tightly--the paddle that answered the purpose of rudder, and com-menced to assist the wind by vigorous strokes.
'Very good, sir,' said Mr Willet, perfectly unmoved; 'then if that was the wind just now, and you'll wait a little time without speaking, you'll hear it say both words very plain.'
There is infinite variety in the gales of wind at sea, and except for the peculiar, terrible, and mysterious moaning that may be heard sometimes passing through the roar of a hurricane - except for that unforgettable sound, as if the soul of the universe had been goaded into a mournful groan - it is, after all, the human voice that stamps the mark of human consciousness upon the character of a gale.
On turning they faced directly against the wind, and snow was beginning to fall.
The whispers of wind became puffs, the sails filled, the Ghost moved.
Suddenly the water let them down with a brutal bang; and, stranded against the side of the wheelhouse, out of breath and bruised, they were left to stagger up in the wind and hold on where they could.