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windpipe

 [wind´ pīp]
popular name for the trachea.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

tra·che·a

, pl.

tra·che·ae

(trā'kē-ă, -kē-ē), [TA]
The air tube extending from the larynx into the thorax to the level of the fifth or sixth thoracic vertebra where it bifurcates into the right and left bronchi. The trachea is composed of 16-20 incomplete rings of hyaline cartilage connected by a membrane (anular ligament); posteriorly, the rings are deficient for one fifth to one third of their circumference, the interval forming the membranous wall being closed by a fibrous membrane containing smooth muscular fibers. Internally, the mucosa is composed of a pseudostratified ciliated columnar epithelium with mucous goblet cells; numerous small mixed mucous and serous glands occur, the ducts of which open to the surface of the epithelium.
Synonym(s): windpipe
[G. tracheia artēria, rough artery]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

windpipe

(wĭnd′pīp′)
n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

trachea

The tubular structure which connects the larynx to the primary bronchi. In non-smokers, it is covered by pseudostratified ciliated columnar epithelium, that transfers particulates out of the bronchi and bronchioles, aided by secretions from mucus-producing goblet cells.

Pronunciation 
Medspeak-UK: pronounced, truh KEY uh 
Medspeak-US: pronounced, TRAY key uh
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

windpipe

Vox populi Trachea
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

tra·che·a

, pl. tracheae (trā'kē-ă, -ē) [TA]
The air tube extending from the larynx into the thorax (level of the fifth or sixth thoracic vertebra), where it bifurcates into the right and left main bronchi. The trachea is composed of 16-20 rings of hyaline cartilage connected by a membrane (anular ligament); posteriorly, the rings are deficient for one fifth to one third of their circumference, the interval forming the membranous wall being closed by a fibrous membrane containing smooth muscular fibers. Internally, the mucosa is composed of a pseudostratified ciliated columnar epithelium with mucous goblet cells; numerous small mixed mucous and serous glands occur, the ducts of which open to the surface of the epithelium.
Synonym(s): windpipe.
[G. tracheia artēria, rough artery]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

windpipe

See TRACHEA.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

tra·che·a

, pl. tracheae (trā'kē-ă, -ē) [TA]
Air tube extending from larynx into thorax to level of the fifth or sixth thoracic vertebra where it bifurcates into right and left bronchi.
Synonym(s): windpipe.
[G. tracheia artēria, rough artery]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Because asthma affects the windpipe, inhaler medicines are the best forms of medicine.
researchers led by Glenn Green at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor reported using 3-D printing to produce a plastic splint for keeping the windpipe intact.
The splint comprises a thin, flexible open tube attached to the outside of the windpipe to provide support.
The great benefit of 3-D printing is that it allowed Green and his colleagues to produce stents specifically designed for each child's windpipe, based on a computed tomography (CT) scan of the windpipe, greatly reducing the chance of failure.
They were seeded in a lab onto a plastic scaffold, where it took less than a week for them to multiply and create a new windpipe.
The windpipe was implanted on April 9 in a nine-hour procedure.
London, July 31 (ANI): In what could be called an innovative procedure, surgeons have performed a windpipe transplant with stem cells to treat a patient with trachea cancer.
While trachea cancer is rare, it is very difficult to treat because it is resistant to chemotherapy and radiation and transplants of mechanical devices to replace the windpipe have not been effective, said Giovannini.
Doctors have given a woman a windpipe with tissue grown from her own stem cells, eliminating the need for anti-rejection drugs.
But Dr Paolo Macchiarini, the head of thoracic surgery at Barcelona's hospital clinic, proposed a windpipe transplant instead.
London, Nov 19 (ANI): A group of researchers has carried out the world's first tissue-engineered whole organ transplant, a windpipe, made with a combination of donated tissue and her own cells.
Left barely able to breathe, the decision was taken in March to attempt the windpipe reconstruction.