windpipe


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windpipe

 [wind´ pīp]
popular name for the trachea.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

tra·che·a

, pl.

tra·che·ae

(trā'kē-ă, -kē-ē), [TA]
The air tube extending from the larynx into the thorax to the level of the fifth or sixth thoracic vertebra where it bifurcates into the right and left bronchi. The trachea is composed of 16-20 incomplete rings of hyaline cartilage connected by a membrane (anular ligament); posteriorly, the rings are deficient for one fifth to one third of their circumference, the interval forming the membranous wall being closed by a fibrous membrane containing smooth muscular fibers. Internally, the mucosa is composed of a pseudostratified ciliated columnar epithelium with mucous goblet cells; numerous small mixed mucous and serous glands occur, the ducts of which open to the surface of the epithelium.
Synonym(s): windpipe
[G. tracheia artēria, rough artery]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

windpipe

(wĭnd′pīp′)
n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

trachea

The tubular structure which connects the larynx to the primary bronchi. In non-smokers, it is covered by pseudostratified ciliated columnar epithelium, that transfers particulates out of the bronchi and bronchioles, aided by secretions from mucus-producing goblet cells.

Pronunciation 
Medspeak-UK: pronounced, truh KEY uh 
Medspeak-US: pronounced, TRAY key uh
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

windpipe

Vox populi Trachea
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

tra·che·a

, pl. tracheae (trā'kē-ă, -ē) [TA]
The air tube extending from the larynx into the thorax (level of the fifth or sixth thoracic vertebra), where it bifurcates into the right and left main bronchi. The trachea is composed of 16-20 rings of hyaline cartilage connected by a membrane (anular ligament); posteriorly, the rings are deficient for one fifth to one third of their circumference, the interval forming the membranous wall being closed by a fibrous membrane containing smooth muscular fibers. Internally, the mucosa is composed of a pseudostratified ciliated columnar epithelium with mucous goblet cells; numerous small mixed mucous and serous glands occur, the ducts of which open to the surface of the epithelium.
Synonym(s): windpipe.
[G. tracheia artēria, rough artery]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

windpipe

See TRACHEA.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

tra·che·a

, pl. tracheae (trā'kē-ă, -ē) [TA]
Air tube extending from larynx into thorax to level of the fifth or sixth thoracic vertebra where it bifurcates into right and left bronchi.
Synonym(s): windpipe.
[G. tracheia artēria, rough artery]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
These devices, which contain the asthma medicines, ought to be used correctly in order for the patients to get the stated doses into their windpipes. Ineffective technique of using these devices is another major reason for poor results in the treatment of asthma.
Anything that can go to the windpipe can cause all the problems.
The six-hour operationsaw the surgical team develop a novel approach to bridging the gap in the patient's windpipe.
"When we looked at the CT scan before the surgery, we could see that a large section of the windpipe was completely gone, and the full extent of the damage only became apparent during the surgery.
Even here we couldn't take it out by a Rigid Bronchoscope, as it was so slippery and was deeply embedded into his bronchus (windpipe).
The splint comprises a thin, flexible open tube attached to the outside of the windpipe to provide support.
While only a handful of patients have received the British lab-made organs so far including tear ducts, blood vessels and windpipes researchers hope they will soon be able to transplant more types of body parts into patients, including what would be the world's first nose made partly from stem cells.
Much of his autobiography -- ''Heimlich's Maneuvers: My Seventy Years of Lifesaving Innovation'' -- focuses on the maneuver, which involves thrusts to the abdomen that apply upward pressure on the diaphragm to create an air flow forcing food or other objects out of the windpipe.
Five months ago, Ethan underwent a unique operation, the first of its kind in the region, where cartilage was taken from his ribs and put into his windpipe to widen the airway.
Hannah's windpipe was made using a plastic half-inch diameter tube that was soaked in a (http://www.nytimes.com/2013/04/30/science/groundbreaking-surgery-for-girl-born-without-windpipe.html?pagewanted=all) stem cell solution taken from her bone marrow and incubated in a device called a bioreactor, the New York Times reports.