windigo

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A creature appearing in the mythology of the Algonquian people who are native to northern US and Canada, who is malevolent, cannibalistic and capable of transforming or possessing humans

windigo

, witigo (win′dĭ-gō″) (wit′ĭ-gō″) [Ojibwa, Cree]
A culture-bound illness, found only in indigenous cultures of Northern Canada, in which people practice cannibalism believing they have been possessed by malevolent spirits. The disease is considered by Western psychiatrists to be a form of depression accompanied by agitation.

Windigo,

(Wittigo), legendary human-like monster that lives in the forests of Quebec, Canada.
Windigo psychosis - severe anxiety neurosis with special reference to food, manifested in melancholia, violence, and obsessive cannibalism, occurring among Canadian Indians.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Windigo is a relatively well-known personage from Cree mythology (present in Dene thought as Wechuge), typically conceived as a former human being who has turned into an anthropophagous monster through greed (paradigmatically, cannibalism).
The distorted perspective of the fictive corporate person resembles the distorted perspective of the Windigo (cf.
This shift from affluence to commoditization devalues community and connection with people and things, promoting the Windigo traits of desire, greed, and hunger, predicated on unnatural growth and acquisitiveness.
I am attempting to establish that there is a relationship between the Windigo and capitalism.
Windigo is conceptually linked to cannibalism, waste, hunger, greed, and the idea of pastahowin: antagonizing spirit beings to invite vengeance.
Here, too, we see traces of the Windigo, as archival records from Trout Lake in the late 1960s allow an early glimpse of the pattern of suicide, "accidents," violence, political client status, and dependency that can be seen in the region today (West man 2008; 2010).
We have also seen how some episodes in regional history can be interpreted through the lens of the Windigo stories.
To do so I will tell another (Trickster) story, but one which does not imply the truth or falsehood of the Windigo connection.
The Windigo (again, not a trickster) and Trickster stories are different interpretations--and to some extent both complementary and alter narratives--of what can happen to wasteful and greedy people who do not consider the impacts of their desires, and to the communities such people inhabit.